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(HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: ffxn8v ()
Date: September 08, 2007 10:33PM

Came upon this story, how true is this??



______________________________________________________________


Here's the text of the story...
It's the full article thus it's a long read but well worth it for any NFA enthusiast who doesn't know the story.

--------------------------
Sunday, February 24, 1984, approximately 2 PM. Gary Fadden, 26, and his lovely 22 year old fiancee are driving from a birthday party in Martinsburg, WV, into Virginia to look at some property for what they hope will be their starter home after their marriage. It's a bitterly cold day, and with the winter coats in the back of a new '84 Ford F-250 supercab 4WD diesel pickup, the Pendleton-clad Fadden looks from a distance like a harmless Yuppie. That means he and the pretty brunette look like prey to another kind of person.

Heading east on Rt. 50, they are passed by a Harley-Davidson motorcycle with two people astride, the operator cutting in front of him so sharply that he has to brake suddenly. Gary comments to his fiancee how cold they must be riding a bike on a low 30s day, and that driving as carelessly as he is, the cyclist needs to worry about sudden patches of ice.

A few minutes later, he spots a Chevy pickup in his rearview mirrors. It contains three people. One passenger is gesturing to him to pull over. Gary doesn't know what these scruffy guys want and he ignores them. But then he sees the passenger waving a knife, and the driver bringing up a revolver.

Gary says to his fiancee, in what will probably be the understatement of his life, "We've got a bit of a problem here."

Pursuit

It is 1984, long before the universal coming of cell phones, and there is no other communications in the vehicle. They are entering Middleburg, a town of perhaps 800, and stop at a red light. Behind them, Gary can see both males exit their truck and run toward him. The driver's hand is actually on Gary's door handle when he pops the clutch and sends his new truck screeching through the intersection against the light. The two men run back to their older pickup, and the chase is on.

They're almost on his bumper. Gary accelerates, hitting open road now, zig-zagging between reaching 95 miles an hour when the speed governor cuts in. Not only are the pursuers keeping pace but he sees the driver aiming a revolver at him out his window. Honking his horn and flashing his lights when he runs into a cluster of automobiles, passing them sometimes on the shoulder of the road and spraying rooster-tails of gravel, Gary still cannot elude the truck behind him.

Gary is desperately looking for a police car he can flag down. He doesn't see one. The chase has gone for 22 miles now and they're getting into a more compact area again. Coming up is an intersection tic knows well: he goes through it every day on his way to work. Even on Sunday it will be clogged. He forms a plan quickly: if the light is in his favor, he'll go through it and keep going, hoping to find police in a more populated area. If the light is against him, he'll turn right, and make for the plant where he works on Chantilly Road.

The light stays red. Gary cuts hard right, heading for what he hopes will be the sanctuary of the workplace. Behind him, he can see that the pursuers haven't given up an inch. "I've got my pass card through the gates and the front door," he tells his fiancee urgently. "We'll get into the building and we can hide. They can't find us. We'll call the cops from there."

He pulls into the front area of the plant, the automatic mechanism taking an achingly long time to raise the gate. As the gate opens, the pursuing truck comes to a stop behind his, both men jumping out and running to Gary's Ford, their hands clawing at his door handles. He guns the engine and gels away from them, sweeping up to the front door and locking up the brakes in a skid.

The plant is Heckler and Koch.

Gary Fadden is a salesman for HK, and among the rest of their firearms, he sells machine guns. In the truck with him is a competitor's weapon he has acquired to test, a Ruger AC556, the selective-fire assault version of the .223 Mini-14. He grabs it now as he throws open the truck door, hoping to hold them off at gunpoint. lie knows his fiancee can't make it to the building's door now, and he screams to her to get down on the floor of the Ford.

The Shooting

The passenger is running toward him, an average size man in ratty clothes with stringy hair, a long beard, and an expression of absolute rage.

The selector switch and manual safety of the AC556 are in two different locations. Gary has not yet fired this weapon and, though he has taken off the safety, he doesn't know whether the switch is set for semi, three-shot burst, or full auto. He yells "Stop or I'll shoot," points the muzzle upward, and pulls the trigger for a warning shot.

The weapon is set on full automatic. Everything is going into deep slow motion, and Gary is aware that the Ruger spits a burst of nine shots before he can get his finger back off the trigger.

There is no effect whatsoever. The attacker is still running at him, perhaps ten yards away and closing fast, reaching for knives at his belt with each hand. The assailant screams, "F*** you and your high powered rifle! I'm gonna kill you motherf***ers!"

And Gary Fadden has run out of time. He lowers the Ruger, points it at the charging knifer, and pulls the trigger one more time. in the ethereal slow motion of profound tachypsychia, Gary can see the spent .223 shells arcing lazily out of the mechanism. He stops the burst, aware that six shots have been fired, as the man in front of him falls heavily to the ground.

Gary moves quickly, putting a big brick planter between himself and the onrushing pickup as cover. The truck stops and the driver, the larger of the two bearded men, shrieks. "F*** you! You killed one of the brothers! You shot him, you motherf***er!" Gary's weapon is level and ready, but this time instead of waving the revolver, the man looks as if he's trying to hide it in the cab of his truck. Gary can see now that the third person in the truck, the one who has always stayed in the cab, is a woman.

And then, the police are there. "They've got guns," Gary shouts to the officers disgorging from two patrol cars. He sets his rifle down and steps back as the officers swarm the pickup truck, taking the surviving man and woman into custody. In a moment, a cop is standing with Gary. "I did it," Gary says. The cop answers, "Did what?" "I shot that man." The officer picks up the AC556. "It's loaded," Gary warns, "Do you want me to unload it'?" The policeman answers. "No, I'll do it. Why don't you sit down?"

Gary Fadden sits on the curb. For a moment, it seems as if the whole bizarre nightmare is over. Unfortunately, it has only begun.

Aftermath

The man he had shot. Billy "Too Loose" Hamilton, was dead. He had been hit by all six rounds of Winchester 55 grain FMJ, headstamped "'WCC81." One bullet had struck behind the lateral midline in the instant that he turned away from the gunfire, taking out a chunk of his spine as is skidded across his back from side to side. This would be interpreted later by the prosecutor as having been "shot in the back."

The partner, who went by the name of "Papa Zoot," had gotten his weapons out of his hands by the time police arrived. In the front of the five-year-old Chevy pickup that had chased Fadden for more than 20 miles, police found a .22 auto pistol and a four-inch Smith & Wesson L-frame .357 Magnum. The revolver had three live and three empty cartridges in the cylinder. More fired brass was on the floor, and a plastic bag with more live amino was open on the seat. Though Fadden heard no shots and no bullets hit his truck, he was convinced then and now that they were shooting at him during the chase.

Hamilton's two knives, a Schrade folding hunter and a nondescript fixed blade, were found with his corpse.

Gary Fadden was arrested that night and charged with 1st degree murder. His family raised $60,000 bail. He hired DC attorney Gerry Treanor to defend him. Treanor, at Gary's request, retained John Farnam and I as expert witnesses. Today, Gary remembers, "Two prosecutors wouldn't touch it until the third took it. It was all political because of the automatic weapon."

The weeklong trial took place in October of 1984. Word had reached Gary that Papa Zoot had bought a .30/06 rifle and sworn a "blood oath" to kill him. I was driving toward Fairfax County when I got the message from Gary's lawyer that John and I wouldn't be needed because the prosecution had self-destructed.

On the stand, Papa Zoot and the woman had testified that Gary had tried to run their biker brother off the road, and they had just followed 22 miles to get his license tag. Defense lawyer Treanor took them apart on cross-examination. An undercover detective broke his cover to testify that the deceased and Papa Zoot "put a bomb in my car. They like to rough people up." The prosecutor made such a show of waving the machine gun that the judge made a point of instructing the jury that the death weapon had nothing whatsoever to do with whether or not the shooting was self-defense. The jury learned that Gary purchased the AC-556 personally and that it was perfectly legal to possess the weapon.

By the start of trial, the charge had been dropped to second-degree murder, and as the trial collapsed around the prosecutor's ears, he offered a plea to manslaughter, which Gary flatly rejected. At the end, when it was announced that the jury had found Gary Fadden Not Guilty on all counts, Fadden recalls that the self-same prosecutor snapped--in open court, in front of Gary's mother--"'You've let a murderer loose!"

"'H&K protected me," says Gary. "They picked up the tab for about half of my legal bills, and got all the publicity for it, until I quit a few years later. Florian Deltgen (at that time CEO at HK) told me after an argument with the vice president that one or the other of us probably had to go, and the vice president wasn't going anywhere. I accepted a job offer from Beretta USA and then resigned from H&K. Deltgen stuck me with the remaining bill, which I paid off at 10% interest." The bill had amounted to more than $45,000. Gary was 34 years old before he had paid everything back.

Dr. Deltgen is no longer with Heckler and Koch.

Lessons

Have communication. In 1984, only the rich had phones in their cars. Today, Gary Fadden is never without a charged-up cell phone. He knows that if he'd had one that day he could have called the police, who would have been able to interdict his pursuers before the thing became a killing situation.

Flight can trigger pursuit. Prey that flees inflames the pursuit instinct of predators. This is why we teach our children never to run from snarling dogs. Gary Fadden did what society told him to do when facing criminals: he ran. They chased. By the time they caught up with him, Billy Hamilton was in such a rage to kill that he could not be deterred.

Understand how deterrence really works. Papa Zoot and Too Loose had guns and amino and knives in their truck with them. In Gary's truck were a Remington Nylon 66.22 rifle (for plinking, and never touched during the incident), a 9mm HK VP70Z pistol, and the AC556 with enough amino for perhaps tour full magazines. None were loaded at the start. The pistol was loaded and placed in the console during the chase, and the rifle was at that point loaded and placed conspicuously on the dashboard by Gary in hopes that it would deter file pursuit. It did not.

When Gary Fadden stepped out of his new Ford at the climax of the chase, most of us would have seen him as an intimidating presence. The man stands six feet eight and weighed 260 pounds at the time, and he was holding a machine gun. His pursuers were unimpressed.

Later identified as belonging to one of the "big four" outlaw motorcycle clubs, Too Loose and Papa Zoot were members of an armed subculture themselves. They did not fear guns. Zoot was about 6'4" and 240 himself, and neither man feared big guys dressed like something off the cover of an L.L. Bean catalog. It is critical to understand this: Criminals don't fear guns. Criminals fear resolutely armed men or women they believe will actually shoot them.

22 miles of running away from them had left these wolves convinced that they were dealing with a large sheep, not the sharp-fanged sheepdog Gary Fadden turned out to be. Testimony that "they liked to rough people up" shows that they had a lot of ego invested in brutalizing others. Perhaps Hamilton, in his last moment on earth, took Fadden's warning burst as an indication of unwillingness to shoot him. Toxicology screen after death showed Hamilton to have a .19% blood alcohol content. This is a level of intoxication consistent with inhibitions being at their lowest. Gary Fadden sums it up today, "The mouse had run, and the cat was loose. Physical size was no deterrent. The gun was no deterrent with these people. If you pull a gun, you'd better be ready to use it."

Politically incorrect "assault weapons" make politically incorrect defendants. Though he didn't say it in so many words, prosecutor Jack Robbins' case against Fadden seemed to be, "I say, Muffy, people of breeding simply don't shoot criminals with machine guns in Fairfax County! Now, had he used a civilized weapon like a Browning Superposed ... and preferably shot him on the rise ... "

You and I know that Class III holders are the ultimate "card carrying good guys and gals." That particular card says they have been investigated for six months by the Federal government and been found trustworthy to possess machine guns. Unfortunately, most of the public in the jury pool, and most politically motivated prosecutors, don't know that. Every self-defense shooting I've run across with a Class III weapon, however justified, has at the very least ended with the shooter facing a grand jury. Asked what he thinks would have happened if he'd shot Hamilton with a Remington 870 Wingmaster instead, Fadden replies with certainty, "I would have gone home that night. I've told dozens of people since, 'Do not use a Class III weapon for personal defense."' Today, the guns Gary is likely to have in his car have neutral images: an M-1 .30 carbine, and a 10mm Glock 20 pistol.

Be there for your friends. It was stunning how many people he had trusted shunned Gary after the shooting, and particularly, after his indictment. He cherishes those who stood beside him through the ordeal, particularly Jim Stone and Rick DeMilt and, most particularly, knife-maker Al Mar.

Much later, after his AC556 had been returned to him by the courts, Gary gave that gun to Al Mar, another man who appreciated a fine weapon of any kind. On its stock was a brass plate engraved "To Al Mar, Because You Understand."

Gary says, "For twenty years now, I've cherished every morning I've gotten up, because I earned every moment of my life. I fought for it."

After Al Mar's death, Gary Fadden scraped up the money to buy his knife business, and he is CEO of Al Mar Knives to this day. One good man carrying on the work of another. It seems fitting.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Gravis ()
Date: September 09, 2007 04:59AM

i didnt read it. where did you get this story?


"the wisdom of the wise will perish, the intelligence of the intelligent will vanish."095042938540

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Fairfax Citizen ()
Date: September 09, 2007 07:13AM

Surely a well-written narrative. In fact, with due respect, it reads like a movie treatment. Reminds me, also, of NRA's case histories on how individuals defended themselves in various circumstances.

I also wondered if a case like this would qualify for Commonwealth assistance under any victim compensation program? To what extend should victims of crimes be compensated? 9-11 families--did they get enough money? VT families--did they get enough money? Do the DAILY murdered victims' families in DC-MD get compensation?

Sorry, wandered off-topic. I didn't know that HK had a local factory. Interesting.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: m4ilm4n ()
Date: September 09, 2007 08:57AM

The old H&K building at the corner of Lee & Willard roads is now (I think) an FCPD Training Facility. I used to live not far from there and remember this story when it happened.

I believe H&K are now in Sterling, off Rt 28 at Severn.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: nakedshoplifter ()
Date: September 09, 2007 09:26AM

That article was writen by respected firearms expert and writer Massad Ayoob for American Handgunner magazine.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: ffxn8v ()
Date: September 09, 2007 09:27AM

m4ilm4n Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The old H&K building at the corner of Lee &
> Willard roads is now (I think) an FCPD Training
> Facility. I used to live not far from there and
> remember this story when it happened.
>
> I believe H&K are now in Sterling, off Rt 28 at
> Severn.


__________________________________________________________________

This is correct, there is an HK factory in Loudon County, still today.

The story was apparently from 1984, before we gave compensation to victims, as mentioned above.

I found it on the "net" and reposted it here - I am not sure how factual it is, although it does seem to account for an entire perspective on it - but by who??

Thought it might be interesting to hear more about - Anyone else?
Thanks.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Fairfax Citizen ()
Date: September 09, 2007 12:56PM

May support the conceal-carry of handguns. Especially if you travel in those areas where these rednecks reside. I don't think we (the Commonwealth or Fairfax County) have a "victims' fund." I'm just concerned that some victims' lives--or rather the grief stricken families--receive or DON'T receive fair compensation. Unfortunately, the lawyers are always present to extract the most "compensation" for the families. For example, looks at the compensation paid to the 9-11 victims; look at the seven VT families wanting to sue the Commonwealth for more money; and, finally, look at any day's toll in the District or PG counties--are there victims' compensation for these families?

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Joe D. ()
Date: September 09, 2007 02:49PM

The incident described never happened in Fairfax Co.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: mike ()
Date: September 10, 2007 11:19AM

Hk does not and has not ever had a US manufacturing facility. All HK weapons are made in Oberndorf, Germany. In the 1980s HK set up shop in Chantilly where the FCPD academy is now, HK moved to a location off of Pacific Blvd in Sterling. Within the last 3 years HK moved to Trusselville, Alabama. All of the US locations are nothing more than offices to focus attention on sales, most of which are to law enforcement...HK is not very civilian friendly.
HK Defence (military sales) is located in Sterling, but that facility is nothing more than a office building.

Joe D.- This incident did happen in Fairfax County...it was one of the only incidents of the use of a Class 3 weapon (fully automatic and registered) in self defence in the US to date.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Vahistorybuff ()
Date: July 05, 2012 04:03PM

HK did manufacture guns in Fairfax - parts were imported from Germany and assembled the plant in Chantilly, VA

The incident did happen and was national news at the time.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Olde Farte, II ()
Date: July 05, 2012 04:48PM

> ...it was one of the only incidents of the use of a Class 3 weapon (fully
> automatic and registered) in self defence in the US to date

I would bet quite a few gun carriers are carrying full-auto glocks or equivalent - I know I'd be tempted to do so if I were the least bit interested in carrying a gun.


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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Ralph Pootawn ()
Date: July 05, 2012 05:23PM

I fired a Ruger AC556 once. Really fun and burns through 30 round mags in seconds.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: 5-0 ()
Date: July 05, 2012 06:52PM

I went to the academy there and heard about what they called a "murder" in the parking lot. It's interesting to hear the story of whar I would call "self defense", and this is obviously not knowing all the facts and hearing only one side of the story.

Anyone know which of the "big four" clubs these nuts belonged to? Having little to base this off of I'm guessing the Pagans by location and time? Am I correct?

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: 113 ()
Date: July 05, 2012 08:17PM

Olde Farte, II Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I would bet quite a few gun carriers are carrying
> full-auto glocks or equivalent - I know I'd be
> tempted to do so if I were the least bit
> interested in carrying a gun.

You'd lose that bet.

A law was passed back in '86 that prevents any new full auto firearms from being added to the civilian registry. Any new production is for police, military, "dealer samples" for stores that are licensed to sell these firearms to police departments, or R&D units for companies that are licensed to manufacture them. Whenever you see a video like the above it is shot at a demo or show of some kind and the owner of the firearm is standing nearby, "maintaining possession" for legal purposes.

This means that the supply of full auto weapons is fixed (declining slowly due to age and wear) but the demand increases, with the effect on prices that you'd expect if you've taken Economics 101. There are very, very few automatic handguns available for transfer to private citizens and those few items have 5 figure price tags, often 10 times the price that a police department would pay for a new one, despite being well over 25 years old. They are like expensive super-cars, generally owned by doctors and lawyers who leave them locked away except for special occasions when they want to impress their friends.


And even if there were any available they would be a horrible choice for self defense. Full size pistols are a pain to carry concealed and if you ever did need to use it then full auto is a horrible choice. You are responsible for every bullet you fire, and firing off a burst with 2 or 3 hitting the bad guy and 5 going who-knows-where is a good way to end up in jail for killing bystanders. Police departments could easily provide these for their officers but they don't because there's simply no need for it under those circumstances.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: hard4themoney ()
Date: July 05, 2012 10:08PM

tl;dr only hear about people shooting the wrong butt holes

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: wtf is this ()
Date: July 05, 2012 11:43PM

OP: can you give us a Cliff's Notes version? I'm not reading all that shit.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Bill.N. ()
Date: July 06, 2012 11:31AM

The article isn't a news account of the 1984 incident. It is something that was written (or posted) by Massad Ayoob around 2004, and it periodically resurfaces on various different gun websites. Near as I can tell the incident did happen, although Mr. Ayoob's version is embellished. The OP did omit the beginning which can be easily found on a number of websites.

The part I love is "Two prosecutors wouldn't touch it until the third took it. It was all political because of the automatic weapon." Anyone who remembers how Horan ran the Fairfax Commonwealth Attorney's office knows this is a load of bull. Also the line 'prosecutor Jack Robbins' case against Fadden seemed to be, "I say, Muffy, people of breeding simply don't shoot criminals with machine guns in Fairfax County! Now, had he used a civilized weapon like a Browning Superposed ... and preferably shot him on the rise ... "' indicates this was written by someone pushing an agenda rather than someone presenting the facts.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: curious ()
Date: July 06, 2012 01:43PM

...
Attachments:
Bro Misted.jpg

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: SnakeDaddy ()
Date: June 12, 2014 02:06PM

I cannot attest to the sequence or validity of events before of after the shooting. The account of the incidents that transpired at the scene of the shooting is accurate. The only inaccuracy to my recollection is that one police officer arrived and engaged in the incident and the second officer arrived a few minutes later. The paramedics were there several minutes before the police arrived.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: GoogleEarth ()
Date: June 12, 2014 03:16PM

It would appear that they either destroyed or built over the underground shooting range at the old HK facility. They used to have ventilation units that could be seen in the area to the north of the building.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Where?? ()
Date: June 12, 2014 11:33PM

GoogleEarth Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> It would appear that they either destroyed or
> built over the underground shooting range at the
> old HK facility. They used to have ventilation
> units that could be seen in the area to the north
> of the building.


Can you post a link or the picture of what you are talking about please.

Thanks

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Old But In The Know ()
Date: June 13, 2014 10:54PM

Yes that facility had a 100 yard underground rifle range and a couple of shorter pistol ranges underground. there was a vent "thing" above ground above the end of the 100 yrd range. There were areas inside where blueing of guns was done several vaults ect. The ranges were big enough to drive a car in them about 12 feet wide 8 feet tall. Lead was a issue. So the ranges were cleaned of all lead and sealed up. FX has the pistol /rifle ranges and driving track across Rt 50 nearby so the range was not needed.It was also to small for training any number of police officers. Fx bought the place.. Late 90's.

HK was trying to get the US military contract to replace the 1911 .45 Auto. Beretta the Italian pistol maker won it and set up shop in Accotink Md on Indian Head Highway, I understand they have left as Marylands law PO'ed them
In time HK went on to another location.

Yes there was a self defense killing in the parking lot with a auto weapon long ago as described above. the guy I understand was a HK salesman.

Not too far away on Rt 50 theres a church and about 1990 or so two guys went on a bank robbery rampage. the PD caught up with them in the church parking lot and one killed his partner then himself. Its on the same side as the Chantilly Cash and Carry and car dealer, Anitas, or what ever its called now just down the road a bit toward Fairfax. That was a truly scary situation with a bank robber who would have killed anyone in his path in the end.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Old But In The Know ()
Date: June 13, 2014 11:21PM

>Hk does not and has not ever had a US manufacturing facility


Read above, yes they made weapons there and assembled them and tested them thats why there were the areas were the guns were blued and those areas had to be cleaned up also.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Old But In the Know ()
Date: June 13, 2014 11:28PM

I cant say they had machine shops in there, but guns were put together there, thats why the blueing tanks were there. It had to do with "making the guns" in the USA for the govt contracts.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: YHnju ()
Date: June 13, 2014 11:44PM

ffxn8v Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Came upon this story, how true is this??
>

It is a complete fabrication by the NRA. Those lieing fucktards right all that bullshit so dumbass gunluvvers have something to crow about. Saintly Leader, may the Prophet smile on him, promised to ban all guns by hook or crook. And he is starting to rumble! GOOD! FINALLY!

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: ...in the 22039 ()
Date: June 14, 2014 10:19AM

Old But In The Know Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Yes that facility had a 100 yard underground rifle
> range and a couple of shorter pistol ranges
> underground. there was a vent "thing" above ground
> above the end of the 100 yrd range. There were
> areas inside where blueing of guns was done
> several vaults ect. The ranges were big enough to
> drive a car in them about 12 feet wide 8 feet
> tall. Lead was a issue. So the ranges were cleaned
> of all lead and sealed up. FX has the pistol
> /rifle ranges and driving track across Rt 50
> nearby so the range was not needed.It was also to
> small for training any number of police officers.
> Fx bought the place.. Late 90's.
>
> HK was trying to get the US military contract to
> replace the 1911 .45 Auto. Beretta the Italian
> pistol maker won it and set up shop in Accotink Md
> on Indian Head Highway, I understand they have
> left as Marylands law PO'ed them
> In time HK went on to another location.
>
> Yes there was a self defense killing in the
> parking lot with a auto weapon long ago as
> described above. the guy I understand was a HK
> salesman.
>
> Not too far away on Rt 50 theres a church and
> about 1990 or so two guys went on a bank robbery
> rampage. the PD caught up with them in the church
> parking lot and one killed his partner then
> himself. Its on the same side as the Chantilly
> Cash and Carry and car dealer, Anitas, or what
> ever its called now just down the road a bit
> toward Fairfax. That was a truly scary situation
> with a bank robber who would have killed anyone in
> his path in the end.


The HK building listed in the original post is now the Fairfax County Police Academy.
The HK Firearms company moved to Loudon County, further north on Rt. 28, and I seem to think the building was across the road from where Nokes Blvd. is today.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Mkdmw ()
Date: June 15, 2014 08:51AM

Gary Fadden is the head of Al Mar Knives.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: if he had a fast car ()
Date: June 15, 2014 09:13AM

he could have just lost them, at the red light I'd have cut the wheel hard to the left then popped it in reverse and slammed their asses back about ten years

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Henro ()
Date: June 16, 2014 10:44AM

I serviced the PBX system at the Severn road location.
The DEA/ATF shared office space there and there was an indoor range down stairs.
This location serviced weapons and assembled arms.
To all the gun nuts like myself they had "the Grey room" which had every varient of HK product on the walls displayed. with a Mark 19 on a tripod on the floor.
The VP at the time told me a story of a womans dumped body across the street in the field
different story.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: DJ Miller ()
Date: December 13, 2015 10:11PM

I was 22 years old when I was driving to the golf range and I saw 2 trucks going down the road at a high speed. The first truck a men was waving his arm out his window. So i pulled over and the first truck went though the gate and the 2nd truck I saw 2 men get out of the 2nd truck running at the 1st truck and then the SHIT happen. The next thing I knew one men was down. The shots where not like and thing I ever heard (in the movies).

I drove to the local police station and told the officer at the front desk and he told me that they would send and officer over (I felt he did not believe me). I drove back and still no police, he was still keeping the other 2 down (not the dead one). About 2 minutes later one officer arrived and the next thing I knew it was like all fairfax county police where there.

The police took me down town to the masse building where I spent 3 hours giving my statement. That was the last time I spoke with the police about this, Then one day I was reading the washington post about this and was shocked that no one called me (the DA). I when looked up the his lawyer phone number. The police had told them that they had lost my name and info. I was in court about 2 days held in a small room with 2 officers at the front door. I then testify after that the next day it was over. I never knew what came of him until today when I was looking to purchase a HK p30sk and ran a cross this story. I have never shot a gun until this week because of what I saw that day.

Hope that Gary is doing well. I would like to talk with him one day.

Sorry but I am not the best writer. The story is true and still lives with me 31 years later.

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Anyone left? ()
Date: December 06, 2018 12:30AM

Anybody here from H&K circa 1984?

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: xwj3c ()
Date: December 06, 2018 09:54PM

Gravis Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> i didnt read it. where did you get this story?

1+

there's word limit like twitter

but there's a "get to the point quick, details later stupid", limit. the limit is currently: 1

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: correction ()
Date: December 06, 2018 09:55PM

1+

there's NO word limit like twitter has

but there IS a "get to the point quick, details later stupid", limit. the limit is currently: 1

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Re: (HK Factory, 1984) How true is this?
Posted by: Quite the challenge ()
Date: December 07, 2018 10:40AM

I hope that you never have to read a complete newspaper article or heaven forbid a book.
We have a whole generation of people with the attention span of a fruit fly.

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