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meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: another knee-slapper ()
Date: February 20, 2021 09:28PM


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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: what is Meade talking about? ()
Date: February 20, 2021 09:45PM

another knee-slapper Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hz25p1ngHZI&pbjrel
> oad=101


The ones where the men go off to work every day to support their family.


Meade wouldn't make it in the 1950s.

Maybe he wouldn't need to, they kept their retards under wraps back then.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: he does mention asylums ()
Date: February 20, 2021 09:49PM

Maybe meade thinks he would have had 3 hots and a cot once he was diagnosed as a nutcase.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Buhbye ()
Date: February 20, 2021 09:56PM

Fuck off, meade. Nobody gives a shit about you.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Daddy Haufe ()
Date: February 20, 2021 10:16PM

"it was a more open minded time"
"police would escort people who looked like they didn't belong in the neighborhood out"

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: interdasting ()
Date: February 20, 2021 10:21PM

is this what meade is talking about when he thinks of "traditional values"
Attachments:
rape.png

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: betcha ()
Date: February 21, 2021 12:37AM

This thread will be down in the day. Meade can't help not being controversial, everytime he opens his mouth he puts his foot in it. But he does say what he means and doesn't talk just to hear himself. Give credit for honesty.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: I'm afraid you're right ()
Date: February 21, 2021 01:32AM

betcha Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> This thread will be down in the day.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Culinary Crime ()
Date: February 21, 2021 02:44AM

I checked out when Meade mentioned putting shrimp in Jello. WTF ?

And what does he have against Bewitched? Elizabeth Montgomery was Hot.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Shrimp Jello ()
Date: February 21, 2021 06:41AM

The most shocking part of the video. Shrimp in jello. Sounds and looks disgusting.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Fat man and Shrimp Jello ()
Date: February 21, 2021 10:54AM

Shrimp Jello Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The most shocking part of the video. Shrimp in
> jello. Sounds and looks disgusting.


Meade's understanding of the fifties comes from sitcoms and Good Housekeeping mags from that period.

Meade has nostalgia for an age that never existed.

I thought no one could be stupid enough to believe those idealized representation of the times reflected the true fifties.


I guess I was wrong...
Attachments:
download (71).gif

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: History is good ()
Date: February 21, 2021 11:59AM

Meade wasn't there. Does he remember McCarthyism, duck and cover, Elvis and Pat Boone stealing songs from Black artists, the self created problems when HST desegregated the armed forces, Jim Crow Laws, and the lack of consumerism in product safety an liability?

Phyllis Schaffly argued for years women should get sole custody of children after a divorce. She was wrong. Does Meade agree the mother is more important in raising kids than the father? Does Meade agree that rape was to be hidden, and women were considered provocative in rape cases?

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: brainwashed retards ()
Date: February 21, 2021 12:13PM

History is good Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Meade wasn't there. Does he remember McCarthyism,
> duck and cover, Elvis and Pat Boone stealing songs
> from Black artists, the self created problems when
> HST desegregated the armed forces, Jim Crow Laws,
> and the lack of consumerism in product safety an
> liability?
>

Alot of these trumptards like Meade wax nostalgic about how great America was in the 50s, not realizing that federal income tax on salaries over 50k was 75%. And it was 91% on income over 200k.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Tax analysis ()
Date: February 21, 2021 12:45PM

brainwashed retards Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> History is good Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Meade wasn't there. Does he remember
> McCarthyism,
> > duck and cover, Elvis and Pat Boone stealing
> songs
> > from Black artists, the self created problems
> when
> > HST desegregated the armed forces, Jim Crow
> Laws,
> > and the lack of consumerism in product safety
> an
> > liability?
> >
>
> Alot of these trumptards like Meade wax nostalgic
> about how great America was in the 50s, not
> realiziwng that federal income tax on salaries over
> 50k was 75%. And it was 91% on income over 200k.

First, there is no word "alot," there is an "allot," but that is a different word.

Second, to contradict the Tax Foundation and Grover Nordquist, between 1950 and 1959, the highest earning 1 percent of Americans paid an effective tax rate of 42 percent. By 2014, it was only down to 36.4 percent—a substantial but by no means astronomical decline. This figure included all state, federal, and payroll taxes.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Meade-waste of a human life ()
Date: February 21, 2021 02:39PM

Meade is in his forties and has yet to figure out how to support himself.

Why does he pine away for the time a man was expected to be the sole support of his family?

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: duck and cover ()
Date: February 21, 2021 03:02PM

brainwashed retards Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> History is good Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Meade wasn't there. Does he remember
> McCarthyism,
> > duck and cover, Elvis and Pat Boone stealing
> songs
> > from Black artists, the self created problems
> when
> > HST desegregated the armed forces, Jim Crow
> Laws,
> > and the lack of consumerism in product safety
> an
> > liability?
> >
>
> Alot of these trumptards like Meade wax nostalgic
> about how great America was in the 50s, not
> realizing that federal income tax on salaries over
> 50k was 75%. And it was 91% on income over 200k.


that drill affected a lot of children mentally. Polio was a big scourge in the 1950s. DDT was not very good. They used to spray it from planes like in the movie "North and Northeast spraying Cary Grant. There was a medication called Thalidomide that caused massive birth defects. Just watch the video by Billy Joel "we didn't start the fire", that explains it well. Meade is living in LALA land again.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Researcher ()
Date: February 21, 2021 06:16PM

Interesting Meade chose the Donna Reed Show as an example. I will give it to Meade, he is right, but for the wing reasons, and a racist motivation.
Let me explain.

In the 1950s and into the 1960s, the depiction of work in television suburbs was sectioned off according to family members. While the suburban dream emphasized a homogeneous definition of the family, domestic architecture was set-up to display class Attributes and reinforce gender-specific functions of domestic space-fathers worked outside of the house, mothers on the inside.

In real life, as well as In television, the suburban model was based on a white, middle-class family, whose fathers/husbands worked outside of the house earning the sole income, and mothers/wives worked from the inside of the house maintaining a high functioning, uniform domestic front. An additional area of work existed that included employees hired from the outside, by the family, to work on the inside. In this channel of employment, different classes and races gained entrance into this otherwise exclusive world.

Historically, the relationship between the suburb and race, specifically African-Americans and Anglo-Americans, both on and off television, has been a strained and evolving one. During the 1950s and 1960s, purchasing a home in the suburbs was
difficult for non-white families. Loan applications, accepted if submitted by whites, were
rejected when filed by black families of similar standing whose backgrounds were carefully screened to make sure they were in fact members of the middle-class.

Furthermore, in many communities where non-white families were allowed residency, They were not permitted to buy houses adjacent to each other in an effort to keep one family of color per block and were often sold lots that bordered on the edges of the Community as a way to isolate these households.

The American suburb/city split, in its formative years, was acutely influenced by
a desire of some to enforce racial separatism and exclusion. The FHA was key in insuring
the all-white demographics of such neighborhoods making these practices more public
policy then just personal opinion.

White-flight from cities to suburbs,
was in many ways a rejection not only of urban living, but also of the communities of
color that inhabited those metropolises. The goals of this utopian
ideal would not benefit everyone: An ideal white and middle-class home life was a
primary means of reconstituting and resocializing the American family after World War
II. By defining access to property and home ownership within the values of the
conventionalized suburban family, women and minorities were guaranteed economic and
social inequality. Racial (white) homogeneity was part of the perk in
selling the suburban American Dream to potential residents, and its exclusionary
philosophies were part of the reality of the racist American Nightmare.


In real life suburbia was easily reflected on
television, there were no people of color in those communities off-screen, there would
be none on-screen as well. The most popular programs depicting these neighborhoods,
such as Father Knows Best, Leave it to Beaver and The Donna Reed Show, had no significant black character roles.

Overall, portrayals of people of color were few and far
between during the early years of television programming, particularly rare was the
depiction of non-white families ( other than "Bula," and "Amos and Andy," and we can get to those later. There were no Black actors ever on the Donna Reed Show, and Leave it to Beaver had one line spoken by a black maid for its six season run. There were no Blacks on Father Knows Best, but a Mexican gardener was featured twice.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Most women ()
Date: February 21, 2021 06:32PM

Girls who went to college during the 50s tend to have majored in Home Economics. Black actors were few. Among the shows that had Black character actors were, Jack Benny Show, although Black comedians like George Kirby were working TV. Lawrence Welk had a Black tap dancer.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: I remember ()
Date: February 21, 2021 06:56PM

Researcher Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Interesting Meade chose the Donna Reed Show as an
> example. I will give it to Meade, he is right,
> but for the wing reasons, and a racist
> motivation.
> Let me explain.
>
> In the 1950s and into the 1960s, the depiction of
> work in television suburbs was sectioned off
> according to family members. While the suburban
> dream emphasized a homogeneous definition of the
> family, domestic architecture was set-up to
> display class Attributes and reinforce
> gender-specific functions of domestic
> space-fathers worked outside of the house, mothers
> on the inside.
>
> In real life, as well as In television, the
> suburban model was based on a white, middle-class
> family, whose fathers/husbands worked outside of
> the house earning the sole income, and
> mothers/wives worked from the inside of the house
> maintaining a high functioning, uniform domestic
> front. An additional area of work existed that
> included employees hired from the outside, by the
> family, to work on the inside. In this channel of
> employment, different classes and races gained
> entrance into this otherwise exclusive world.
>
> Historically, the relationship between the suburb
> and race, specifically African-Americans and
> Anglo-Americans, both on and off television, has
> been a strained and evolving one. During the 1950s
> and 1960s, purchasing a home in the suburbs was
> difficult for non-white families. Loan
> applications, accepted if submitted by whites,
> were
> rejected when filed by black families of similar
> standing whose backgrounds were carefully
> screened to make sure they were in fact members of
> the middle-class.
>
> Furthermore, in many communities where non-white
> families were allowed residency, They were not
> permitted to buy houses adjacent to each other in
> an effort to keep one family of color per block
> and were often sold lots that bordered on the
> edges of the Community as a way to isolate these
> households.
>
> The American suburb/city split, in its formative
> years, was acutely influenced by
> a desire of some to enforce racial separatism and
> exclusion. The FHA was key in insuring
> the all-white demographics of such neighborhoods
> making these practices more public
> policy then just personal opinion.
>
> White-flight from cities to suburbs,
> was in many ways a rejection not only of urban
> living, but also of the communities of
> color that inhabited those metropolises. The goals
> of this utopian
> ideal would not benefit everyone: An ideal white
> and middle-class home life was a
> primary means of reconstituting and resocializing
> the American family after World War
> II. By defining access to property and home
> ownership within the values of the
> conventionalized suburban family, women and
> minorities were guaranteed economic and
> social inequality. Racial (white) homogeneity was
> part of the perk in
> selling the suburban American Dream to potential
> residents, and its exclusionary
> philosophies were part of the reality of the
> racist American Nightmare.
>
>
> In real life suburbia was easily reflected on
> television, there were no people of color in those
> communities off-screen, there would
> be none on-screen as well. The most popular
> programs depicting these neighborhoods,
> such as Father Knows Best, Leave it to Beaver and
> The Donna Reed Show, had no significant black
> character roles.
>
> Overall, portrayals of people of color were few
> and far
> between during the early years of television
> programming, particularly rare was the
> depiction of non-white families ( other than
> "Bula," and "Amos and Andy," and we can get to
> those later. There were no Black actors ever on
> the Donna Reed Show, and Leave it to Beaver had
> one line spoken by a black maid for its six season
> run. There were no Blacks on Father Knows Best,
> but a Mexican gardener was featured twice.


a young Greg Morris on "Dick Van Dyke Show", only Black I recall on that show. Sammy Davis Jr on the "Rifleman" showing off his gun handling abilities, Sammy had the fastest most accurate draw in Hollywood. The "Goldbergs", a early situation comedy about a Jewish Family was popular. Adventures of Boston Blackie was popular but he was white. Most Black actors in Hollywood would be used just as extras in Tarzan movies as natives; or as train or toilet attendants, servants, slaves, roles like that..

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: tell the distorted view guy ()
Date: February 21, 2021 07:07PM

He'll just love meade's take on American history

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Meade just wants ()
Date: February 21, 2021 07:29PM

What we all want and what Lizze finally got,,,a piece of the Pie.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Don't worry about that3 ()
Date: February 21, 2021 07:35PM

tell the distorted view guy Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> He'll just love meade's take on American history


An image from the distorted view discord was posted on this very thread.

He'll find out about it.

He better be one of Meade's two patrons on Patreon.

People shouldn't profit from Meade without giving him a cut.

He is a re-upload of it.
Attachments:
dvdic.png

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Spacy ()
Date: February 21, 2021 07:51PM

Ummm, Botson Blackie was never about a black man.

The character's last name was "Black".
And the wise guys, mmyah, they called
him "Blackie", mmyah, "Blackie".
Mmmyeahaaa see, copper?

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: he got his piece of the pie ()
Date: February 21, 2021 07:53PM

Meade just wants Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> What we all want and what Lizze finally got,,,a
> piece of the Pie.


and already ate it.

20 years of free room and board!

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Reseacher ()
Date: February 21, 2021 08:45PM

I remember Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Researcher Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Interesting Meade chose the Donna Reed Show as
> an
> > example. I will give it to Meade, he is right,
> > but for the wing reasons, and a racist
> > motivation.
> > Let me explain.
> >
> > In the 1950s and into the 1960s, the depiction
> of
> > work in television suburbs was sectioned off
> > according to family members. While the suburban
> > dream emphasized a homogeneous definition of
> the
> > family, domestic architecture was set-up to
> > display class Attributes and reinforce
> > gender-specific functions of domestic
> > space-fathers worked outside of the house,
> mothers
> > on the inside.
> >
> > In real life, as well as In television, the
> > suburban model was based on a white,
> middle-class
> > family, whose fathers/husbands worked outside
> of
> > the house earning the sole income, and
> > mothers/wives worked from the inside of the
> house
> > maintaining a high functioning, uniform
> domestic
> > front. An additional area of work existed that
> > included employees hired from the outside, by
> the
> > family, to work on the inside. In this channel
> of
> > employment, different classes and races gained
> > entrance into this otherwise exclusive world.
> >
> > Historically, the relationship between the
> suburb
> > and race, specifically African-Americans and
> > Anglo-Americans, both on and off television,
> has
> > been a strained and evolving one. During the
> 1950s
> > and 1960s, purchasing a home in the suburbs was
>
> > difficult for non-white families. Loan
> > applications, accepted if submitted by whites,
> > were
> > rejected when filed by black families of
> similar
> > standing whose backgrounds were carefully
> > screened to make sure they were in fact members
> of
> > the middle-class.
> >
> > Furthermore, in many communities where
> non-white
> > families were allowed residency, They were not
> > permitted to buy houses adjacent to each other
> in
> > an effort to keep one family of color per block
> > and were often sold lots that bordered on the
> > edges of the Community as a way to isolate
> these
> > households.
> >
> > The American suburb/city split, in its
> formative
> > years, was acutely influenced by
> > a desire of some to enforce racial separatism
> and
> > exclusion. The FHA was key in insuring
> > the all-white demographics of such
> neighborhoods
> > making these practices more public
> > policy then just personal opinion.
> >
> > White-flight from cities to suburbs,
> > was in many ways a rejection not only of urban
> > living, but also of the communities of
> > color that inhabited those metropolises. The
> goals
> > of this utopian
> > ideal would not benefit everyone: An ideal
> white
> > and middle-class home life was a
> > primary means of reconstituting and
> resocializing
> > the American family after World War
> > II. By defining access to property and home
> > ownership within the values of the
> > conventionalized suburban family, women and
> > minorities were guaranteed economic and
> > social inequality. Racial (white) homogeneity
> was
> > part of the perk in
> > selling the suburban American Dream to
> potential
> > residents, and its exclusionary
> > philosophies were part of the reality of the
> > racist American Nightmare.
> >
> >
> > In real life suburbia was easily reflected on
> > television, there were no people of color in
> those
> > communities off-screen, there would
> > be none on-screen as well. The most popular
> > programs depicting these neighborhoods,
> > such as Father Knows Best, Leave it to Beaver
> and
> > The Donna Reed Show, had no significant black
> > character roles.
> >
> > Overall, portrayals of people of color were
> few
> > and far
> > between during the early years of television
> > programming, particularly rare was the
> > depiction of non-white families ( other than
> > "Bula," and "Amos and Andy," and we can get to
> > those later. There were no Black actors ever
> on
> > the Donna Reed Show, and Leave it to Beaver had
> > one line spoken by a black maid for its six
> season
> > run. There were no Blacks on Father Knows
> Best,
> > but a Mexican gardener was featured twice.
>
>
> a young Greg Morris on "Dick Van Dyke Show", only
> Black I recall on that show. Sammy Davis Jr on
> the "Rifleman" showing off his gun handling
> abilities, Sammy had the fastest most accurate
> draw in Hollywood. The "Goldbergs", a early
> situation comedy about a Jewish Family was
> popular. Adventures of Boston Blackie was popular
> but he was white. Most Black actors in Hollywood
> would be used just as extras in Tarzan movies as
> natives; or as train or toilet attendants,
> servants, slaves, roles like that..

My point was about suberbia and the White family as depicted on TV in the 1950's.

In the 1960's, we were given a few new shows with Black stars, "Julia" being the first to Star a Black woman. But it wasn't until the 1970's when we were given a show about a Black family with both a father and a mother (Good Times).

For Meade to celebrate a time and a place that didn't exist, and believe he was supposed to be part of it, is saddening. And, by the way, the daughter on the show was an entitled self centered bitch who showed no emotion toward anyone but herself.

To Meade's disappointment Donna Reed left the Republican Party after 1964, was a strong anti war activist, and supported Engine Mccarthy in 1968.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: pussy hacker ()
Date: February 21, 2021 08:48PM

hack this

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Meade sold out ()
Date: February 21, 2021 09:30PM

Meade might have said that putting on a Yankee uniform to star in a movie was the hardest thing he had to do, but he profited from that. Same as a Yankee getting paid soldier's pay back during the War. Explain that in your next volg Meade? Why you put on a Yankee uniform. It made me sick to see.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Steve Urkel ()
Date: February 21, 2021 10:09PM

Reseacher Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I remember Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Researcher Wrote:
> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> > -----
> > > Interesting Meade chose the Donna Reed Show
> as
> > an
> > > example. I will give it to Meade, he is
> right,
> > > but for the wing reasons, and a racist
> > > motivation.
> > > Let me explain.
> > >
> > > In the 1950s and into the 1960s, the
> depiction
> > of
> > > work in television suburbs was sectioned off
> > > according to family members. While the
> suburban
> > > dream emphasized a homogeneous definition of
> > the
> > > family, domestic architecture was set-up to
> > > display class Attributes and reinforce
> > > gender-specific functions of domestic
> > > space-fathers worked outside of the house,
> > mothers
> > > on the inside.
> > >
> > > In real life, as well as In television, the
> > > suburban model was based on a white,
> > middle-class
> > > family, whose fathers/husbands worked outside
> > of
> > > the house earning the sole income, and
> > > mothers/wives worked from the inside of the
> > house
> > > maintaining a high functioning, uniform
> > domestic
> > > front. An additional area of work existed
> that
> > > included employees hired from the outside, by
> > the
> > > family, to work on the inside. In this
> channel
> > of
> > > employment, different classes and races
> gained
> > > entrance into this otherwise exclusive world.
>
> > >
> > > Historically, the relationship between the
> > suburb
> > > and race, specifically African-Americans and
> > > Anglo-Americans, both on and off television,
> > has
> > > been a strained and evolving one. During the
> > 1950s
> > > and 1960s, purchasing a home in the suburbs
> was
> >
> > > difficult for non-white families. Loan
> > > applications, accepted if submitted by
> whites,
> > > were
> > > rejected when filed by black families of
> > similar
> > > standing whose backgrounds were carefully
> > > screened to make sure they were in fact
> members
> > of
> > > the middle-class.
> > >
> > > Furthermore, in many communities where
> > non-white
> > > families were allowed residency, They were
> not
> > > permitted to buy houses adjacent to each
> other
> > in
> > > an effort to keep one family of color per
> block
> > > and were often sold lots that bordered on the
> > > edges of the Community as a way to isolate
> > these
> > > households.
> > >
> > > The American suburb/city split, in its
> > formative
> > > years, was acutely influenced by
> > > a desire of some to enforce racial separatism
> > and
> > > exclusion. The FHA was key in insuring
> > > the all-white demographics of such
> > neighborhoods
> > > making these practices more public
> > > policy then just personal opinion.
> > >
> > > White-flight from cities to suburbs,
> > > was in many ways a rejection not only of
> urban
> > > living, but also of the communities of
> > > color that inhabited those metropolises. The
> > goals
> > > of this utopian
> > > ideal would not benefit everyone: An ideal
> > white
> > > and middle-class home life was a
> > > primary means of reconstituting and
> > resocializing
> > > the American family after World War
> > > II. By defining access to property and home
> > > ownership within the values of the
> > > conventionalized suburban family, women and
> > > minorities were guaranteed economic and
> > > social inequality. Racial (white) homogeneity
> > was
> > > part of the perk in
> > > selling the suburban American Dream to
> > potential
> > > residents, and its exclusionary
> > > philosophies were part of the reality of the
> > > racist American Nightmare.
> > >
> > >
> > > In real life suburbia was easily reflected on
>
> > > television, there were no people of color in
> > those
> > > communities off-screen, there would
> > > be none on-screen as well. The most popular
> > > programs depicting these neighborhoods,
> > > such as Father Knows Best, Leave it to Beaver
> > and
> > > The Donna Reed Show, had no significant black
> > > character roles.
> > >
> > > Overall, portrayals of people of color were
> > few
> > > and far
> > > between during the early years of television
> > > programming, particularly rare was the
> > > depiction of non-white families ( other than
> > > "Bula," and "Amos and Andy," and we can get
> to
> > > those later. There were no Black actors ever
> > on
> > > the Donna Reed Show, and Leave it to Beaver
> had
> > > one line spoken by a black maid for its six
> > season
> > > run. There were no Blacks on Father Knows
> > Best,
> > > but a Mexican gardener was featured twice.
> >
> >
> > a young Greg Morris on "Dick Van Dyke Show",
> only
> > Black I recall on that show. Sammy Davis Jr on
> > the "Rifleman" showing off his gun handling
> > abilities, Sammy had the fastest most accurate
> > draw in Hollywood. The "Goldbergs", a early
> > situation comedy about a Jewish Family was
> > popular. Adventures of Boston Blackie was
> popular
> > but he was white. Most Black actors in
> Hollywood
> > would be used just as extras in Tarzan movies
> as
> > natives; or as train or toilet attendants,
> > servants, slaves, roles like that..
>
> My point was about suberbia and the White family
> as depicted on TV in the 1950's.
>
> In the 1960's, we were given a few new shows with
> Black stars, "Julia" being the first to Star a
> Black woman. But it wasn't until the 1970's when
> we were given a show about a Black family with
> both a father and a mother (Good Times).
>
> For Meade to celebrate a time and a place that
> didn't exist, and believe he was supposed to be
> part of it, is saddening. And, by the way, the
> daughter on the show was an entitled self centered
> bitch who showed no emotion toward anyone but
> herself.
>
> To Meade's disappointment Donna Reed left the
> Republican Party after 1964, was a strong anti war
> activist, and supported Engine Mccarthy in 1968.


Please donate to Paul Petersons' A Little Consideration Charity. Charity was organized by former Donna Reed Show Star Peterson to assist kids who were popular in entertainment but just fizzled out, like Danny Bonaduce, the cast from such shows as "Who's the Boss" and "Mickey Mouse Club:. Kids that lost their popularity.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Happy Days ()
Date: February 21, 2021 10:25PM

Nearly 15 minutes of pining for the 50’s and not a single word about Ralph Malph or the Fons? Heeeeeey

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Happy Days ()
Date: February 21, 2021 10:47PM

I was always fascinated with the 50's, which ended about 12 years before I was born. Grew up loving those old cars, watching Lucy and Beaver and a bunch of other great re-runs. Parents and grandparents always told me about the good old days.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: She's knocked up ()
Date: February 22, 2021 09:51AM

What the hell is he talking about? Ricky Nelson was forced into marriage after getting his girlfriend pregnant. They even sent out a press release after the baby was born saying the child was born premature. She was not.

About three fifths of alll abortions in the 1950's, legal or not, were given to non married young women (as depicted accurately in the movie "Cidar House Rules"). Taking a long weekend in Puerto Rico was code for going down and getting an abortion.

According to OB GYN journals at the time, About 30% of women who got married in the 1920's through 1950's were pregnant at the time, giving us the term "shotgun wedding." The Pentagon had rules for servicemen who got American women (stateside) pregnant, which included marrying them.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Better life ()
Date: February 22, 2021 11:21AM

What concerns me, after watching what should be a parody, is the extremely narrow and unbalanced view of history this man received from television, resulting in a pervasive and terrible ignorance of our nation and its historic, many times flawed, roots. The video displays clearly his desire to negate the great strides our society has made over the last 60 years with regards to Civil Rights for all.

How, after all, can people know how far we, as a fractured society in the 1950's, have come, if they don’t know, or they have a polyannish distorted view of, where we started?

Voting rights. Civil rights, women's rights, birth control, better education for minorities, stoping the draft, the EPA, opening universities to the poor, and laws against red lining and housing discrimination, were all below the radar issues in the 1950's for most white people. To celebrate that time over today is simply chosen ignorant bliss.

As Franklin, the statesman not the cartoon turtle, said," the golden age is never the present."

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Meade is smart? ()
Date: February 22, 2021 03:53PM

Many homes had Bomb Shelters. Yes Meade actual bomb shelters. All public building had a Civil Defense Shelter sign. Religious prayer was taken out of the Public classrooms, every Friday at noon Civil Defense sirens were tested. we never came closer to actual Nuclear War, total destruction than during the Cuban Missile thing. Cigarettes were all over the place, everyone smoked. Lead gas pollution. Don't ever tell people who lived through it how great it was!!!!!! You know nothing of the 1950s!!!!!!

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Spacy ()
Date: February 23, 2021 01:38AM

Why is everyone picking on a retard?

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: peep ()
Date: February 23, 2021 02:02AM

Spacy Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Why is everyone picking on a retard?



That's just the nature of the filth that resides on this website, Spacy. You've been here for a long time. I'm surprised you haven't figured this out yet.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: At least people post here! ()
Date: February 23, 2021 02:08AM

Nobody posts on peep's shitty site - not even filth

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: peep ()
Date: February 23, 2021 02:23AM

At least people post here! Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Nobody posts on peep's shitty site - not even
> filth


True shit. I don't think you've heard me complain at all about my forum being slow. Keeps the bills low. It'll take off with proper advertisement. Only thing is, not a lot of people know about Virginia Connected. Obviously it's going to be slow.



Goodbye.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Glad you enjoy failure ()
Date: February 23, 2021 02:43AM

peep Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> At least people post here! Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Nobody posts on peep's shitty site - not even
> > filth
>
>
> True shit. I don't think you've heard me complain
> at all about my forum being dead
> Only thing is, no people know about
> Virginia Connected. Obviously it's dead.
>
>
>
> Good riddance

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: picking on retards ()
Date: February 23, 2021 12:33PM

Spacy Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Why is everyone picking on a retard?


picking on retards constitutes 90% of activity on this site. Sometimes it's retards picking on each other.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: NIGGER BUCK ()
Date: February 23, 2021 12:46PM

.
Attachments:
1610432656554.gif
1610665490425.png

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Always room for Meade ()
Date: February 23, 2021 12:52PM

At least people post here! Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Nobody posts on peep's shitty site - not even
> filth


Does Meade post there yet?

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: no - meade won't go there ()
Date: February 23, 2021 01:21PM

he doesn't trust peep!

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: i don't think its picking ()
Date: February 23, 2021 05:25PM

Not really picking on Meade, it is more like setting him straight. He comes out with all kinds of nonsense about the 1950s. "Happy Days", the TV show, was garbage. A pencil necked geek like "the Fonz", would get his butt kicked if he encountered real leather jacketed hoods with engineering boots and switchblades. Have to set Meade straight. He just can't say what he wants regardless of the truth of the matter.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: Picking on retards like eesh ()
Date: February 23, 2021 09:23PM

picking on retards Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Spacy Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Why is everyone picking on a retard?
>
>
> picking on retards constitutes 90% of activity on
> this site. Sometimes it's retards picking on each
> other.

Yeah like eesh and miz

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: mostly Miz ()
Date: February 23, 2021 10:30PM

90% of the anti-Meade posts come from William Moreno

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: proposition ()
Date: February 24, 2021 10:13PM

mostly Miz Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> 90% of the anti-Meade posts come from William
> Moreno


Meade and miz should form a collaboration team, Miz does the lyrics and Meade does the music. That might be lucrative. miz has a talent with words, he writes some great stories.

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Re: meade waxes nostalgic for the 1950s (at least as they were portrayed on I Love Lucy)
Posted by: miz does the cover art ()
Date: February 25, 2021 12:44AM

because, is art is just as good as meade's music!

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