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Dads now wish they had gotten sons proper shirts, like Tyrwhitt, for Christmas!
Posted by: Proper attire, please ()
Date: January 10, 2021 01:27PM

What an embarrassment for fathers. They let their sons down. Dads, make sure your sons have proper shirts, like Tyrwhitts, to wear for all occasions, including seditious riots. Otherwise, they may just have to wear their frat party Halloween costume, or ilfitting hoodies with advertisements on them, to attempted coups.

Just think, the Repubicans went from the Brooks Bros demonstrations in 2000, to the "college entitled slacker taking selfies look" storming or the Capitol in 2021. Sad how the mighty have fallen.
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Re: Dads now wish they had gotten sons proper shirts, like Tyrwhitt, for Christmas!
Posted by: A gentleman ()
Date: January 10, 2021 01:49PM

Would it of killed them to wear a button down and a cashmere or camel hair jacket, or at least a blue blazer, to an attempted overthrow of our government? I think not.

They could have gone to the Men's Store at Saks and said, "I will be attempting sidition, and pictures of me will be all over the place. Can You help me dress properly for this occasion?"

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Re: Dads now wish they had gotten sons proper shirts, like Tyrwhitt, for Christmas!
Posted by: Franco ()
Date: January 10, 2021 02:15PM

I always respected the French and Italians for dressing appropriately for demonstrations and riots.
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Re: Dads now wish they had gotten sons proper shirts, like Tyrwhitt, for Christmas!
Posted by: Gillette ()
Date: January 10, 2021 02:47PM

Proper attire, please Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> What an embarrassment for fathers. They let their
> sons down. Dads, make sure your sons have proper
> shirts, like Tyrwhitts, to wear for all
> occasions, including seditious riots. Otherwise,
> they may just have to wear their frat party
> Halloween costume, or ilfitting hoodies with
> advertisements on them, to attempted coups.
>
> Just think, the Repubicans went from the Brooks
> Bros demonstrations in 2000, to the "college
> entitled slacker taking selfies look" storming or
> the Capitol in 2021. Sad how the mighty have
> fallen.

It also appears these negligent dads also forget to teach their sons how to shave? Are the Republicans the party of deadbeat dads now?

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Re: Dads now wish they had gotten sons proper shirts, like Tyrwhitt, for Christmas!
Posted by: Properly dressed ()
Date: January 10, 2021 05:34PM

Amid all the marches and protests for social justice that took place over the summer in America, every day since George Floyd was killed while in police custody on May 25, two protests stood out: the thousands dressed in white who thronged Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn in support of black trans lives; and, farther south, the thousands gathered in Columbia, S.C., “fully adorned in their Sunday best,” according to one of the organizers of that city’s Million Man March for racial justice.

They wore suits in bright red, shell pink, dove gray and burgundy; jewel-toned ties and plaid bow ties; striped button-up shirts and crisp white ones. Sundresses and tulle dresses and sleeveless silk tops. And they were gussied up on purpose.

From its inception, the march organizers had specified: “Come in dress attire please.” The point being, said Leo Jones, who came up with the idea for Columbia’s Million Man March, to “reframe the narrative and build a sense of joy in our community to see us looking so well, and marching with such pride.”

Almost every protest movement has its visual signifiers: images etched in the collective memory that crystallize the causes for which they were fought. The white dresses of the suffragists and the women’s rights movements. The neat black suits and white button-up shirts of the original civil rights protests. The Black Panthers in leathers and turtlenecks. The followers of Mahatma Gandhi in Gandhi caps and khadi shirts. The sans-culottes of the French Revolution and the yellow vests of the French revolt centuries later.

But the current moment, in part because of its extraordinary reach and multiracial, multinational dimensions, as well as the fact it has been organized largely over social media without a strategic centralized body, has been notably diffuse. As Robin Givhan wrote in The Washington Post, “There’s no cohesion in the look of the marching multitudes.”

They have been resplendent in the uniform of no uniform.

Richard Ford, a professor at Stanford Law School focused on civil rights and the author of the upcoming “Dress Codes: Crimes of Fashion and Laws of Attire,” wrote “there’s a tension in this moment reflected in questions around dress code, and to what extent do we want to tear down the system or to what extent do we want to reform it.”

Yet, said Eddie M. Eades Jr., another organizer of the South Carolina event, “iconography matters.”

And what both the march in Brooklyn and the march in South Carolina suggest is that the iconography of the current upheaval is beginning to evolve and coalesce.

In other words, the BLM Movement in New York and South Carolina cared enough to look presentable when representing a cause, the clowns at the Capitol didn't even think to present themselves well. This privileged white class chose to not make presentable dress a requirement, or ignored its usefulness in getting credibility for their message. They dressed like thugs, wearing "comfortable clothing," suited not for representing a political debate, but more apt for a looting TV's during a power black out.

They ultimately acted accordingly.

Their message was dismissed by the American people.

My freshman year of university in a dank Scottish hills dorm was full of convivial mass drinking at night, and awful tidy up the next morning. My second year we had a welcome back party to start the first trimester. We did something different for this soirée and required a dress code to attend. Jackets and ties for the lads, and dresses for the lasses. We had a great party, and in the morning there was very little to do in regards to tidying up. People when well dressed behave themselves, use the waste baskets, try not to spill, have better eating habits, and respect those around them who don similar

I cannot give credence to those who stormed the Capitol. I cannot juxtapose their motive with motivation of the clean shaven with fresh hair cuts, turtle neck and grey jacket wearing Panther's political message of the 1960's. I can only compare them to the slugs who terrorized Birmingham streets at night (Who Jeremy Clarkson called "hoodies"), just a few summers ago.


Dipatched from SoHo, London. It's bedtime chaps.

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Re: Dads now wish they had gotten sons proper shirts, like Tyrwhitt, for Christmas!
Posted by: aufrang ()
Date: January 10, 2021 05:47PM























































































































































































































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Re: Dads now wish they had gotten sons proper shirts, like Tyrwhitt, for Christmas!
Posted by: Poster extraditions ()
Date: January 11, 2021 11:54AM

Properly dressed Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Amid all the marches and protests for social
> justice that took place over the summer in
> America, every day since George Floyd was killed
> while in police custody on May 25, two protests
> stood out: the thousands dressed in white who
> thronged Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn in support of
> black trans lives; and, farther south, the
> thousands gathered in Columbia, S.C., “fully
> adorned in their Sunday best,” according to one
> of the organizers of that city’s Million Man
> March for racial justice.
>
> They wore suits in bright red, shell pink, dove
> gray and burgundy; jewel-toned ties and plaid bow
> ties; striped button-up shirts and crisp white
> ones. Sundresses and tulle dresses and sleeveless
> silk tops. And they were gussied up on purpose.
>
> From its inception, the march organizers had
> specified: “Come in dress attire please.” The
> point being, said Leo Jones, who came up with the
> idea for Columbia’s Million Man March, to
> “reframe the narrative and build a sense of joy
> in our community to see us looking so well, and
> marching with such pride.”
>
> Almost every protest movement has its visual
> signifiers: images etched in the collective memory
> that crystallize the causes for which they were
> fought. The white dresses of the suffragists and
> the women’s rights movements. The neat black
> suits and white button-up shirts of the original
> civil rights protests. The Black Panthers in
> leathers and turtlenecks. The followers of Mahatma
> Gandhi in Gandhi caps and khadi shirts. The
> sans-culottes of the French Revolution and the
> yellow vests of the French revolt centuries
> later.
>
> But the current moment, in part because of its
> extraordinary reach and multiracial, multinational
> dimensions, as well as the fact it has been
> organized largely over social media without a
> strategic centralized body, has been notably
> diffuse. As Robin Givhan wrote in The Washington
> Post, “There’s no cohesion in the look of the
> marching multitudes.”
>
> They have been resplendent in the uniform of no
> uniform.
>
> Richard Ford, a professor at Stanford Law School
> focused on civil rights and the author of the
> upcoming “Dress Codes: Crimes of Fashion and
> Laws of Attire,” wrote “there’s a tension
> in this moment reflected in questions around dress
> code, and to what extent do we want to tear down
> the system or to what extent do we want to reform
> it.”
>
> Yet, said Eddie M. Eades Jr., another organizer of
> the South Carolina event, “iconography
> matters.”
>
> And what both the march in Brooklyn and the march
> in South Carolina suggest is that the iconography
> of the current upheaval is beginning to evolve and
> coalesce.
>
> In other words, the BLM Movement in New York and
> South Carolina cared enough to look presentable
> when representing a cause, the clowns at the
> Capitol didn't even think to present themselves
> well. This privileged white class chose to not
> make presentable dress a requirement, or ignored
> its usefulness in getting credibility for their
> message. They dressed like thugs, wearing
> "comfortable clothing," suited not for
> representing a political debate, but more apt for
> a looting TV's during a power black out.
>
> They ultimately acted accordingly.
>
> Their message was dismissed by the American
> people.
>
> My freshman year of university in a dank Scottish
> hills dorm was full of convivial mass drinking at
> night, and awful tidy up the next morning. My
> second year we had a welcome back party to start
> the first trimester. We did something different
> for this soirée and required a dress code to
> attend. Jackets and ties for the lads, and
> dresses for the lasses. We had a great party, and
> in the morning there was very little to do in
> regards to tidying up. People when well dressed
> behave themselves, use the waste baskets, try not
> to spill, have better eating habits, and respect
> those around them who don similar
>
> I cannot give credence to those who stormed the
> Capitol. I cannot juxtapose their motive with
> motivation of the clean shaven with fresh hair
> cuts, turtle neck and grey jacket wearing
> Panther's political message of the 1960's. I can
> only compare them to the slugs who terrorized
> Birmingham streets at night (Who Jeremy Clarkson
> called "hoodies"), just a few summers ago.
>
>
> Dipatched from SoHo, London. It's bedtime chaps.

Researched and we'll sourced opinions are not allowed on FU. You are more than welcome to reprint Breitbart.

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Re: Dads now wish they had gotten sons proper shirts, like Tyrwhitt, for Christmas!
Posted by: Cute ginger on the right ()
Date: January 13, 2021 07:23PM

Properly dressed Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Amid all the marches and protests for social
> justice that took place over the summer in
> America, every day since George Floyd was killed
> while in police custody on May 25, two protests
> stood out: the thousands dressed in white who
> thronged Eastern Parkway in Brooklyn in support of
> black trans lives; and, farther south, the
> thousands gathered in Columbia, S.C., “fully
> adorned in their Sunday best,” according to one
> of the organizers of that city’s Million Man
> March for racial justice.
>
> They wore suits in bright red, shell pink, dove
> gray and burgundy; jewel-toned ties and plaid bow
> ties; striped button-up shirts and crisp white
> ones. Sundresses and tulle dresses and sleeveless
> silk tops. And they were gussied up on purpose.
>
> From its inception, the march organizers had
> specified: “Come in dress attire please.” The
> point being, said Leo Jones, who came up with the
> idea for Columbia’s Million Man March, to
> “reframe the narrative and build a sense of joy
> in our community to see us looking so well, and
> marching with such pride.”
>
> Almost every protest movement has its visual
> signifiers: images etched in the collective memory
> that crystallize the causes for which they were
> fought. The white dresses of the suffragists and
> the women’s rights movements. The neat black
> suits and white button-up shirts of the original
> civil rights protests. The Black Panthers in
> leathers and turtlenecks. The followers of Mahatma
> Gandhi in Gandhi caps and khadi shirts. The
> sans-culottes of the French Revolution and the
> yellow vests of the French revolt centuries
> later.
>
> But the current moment, in part because of its
> extraordinary reach and multiracial, multinational
> dimensions, as well as the fact it has been
> organized largely over social media without a
> strategic centralized body, has been notably
> diffuse. As Robin Givhan wrote in The Washington
> Post, “There’s no cohesion in the look of the
> marching multitudes.”
>
> They have been resplendent in the uniform of no
> uniform.
>
> Richard Ford, a professor at Stanford Law School
> focused on civil rights and the author of the
> upcoming “Dress Codes: Crimes of Fashion and
> Laws of Attire,” wrote “there’s a tension
> in this moment reflected in questions around dress
> code, and to what extent do we want to tear down
> the system or to what extent do we want to reform
> it.”
>
> Yet, said Eddie M. Eades Jr., another organizer of
> the South Carolina event, “iconography
> matters.”
>
> And what both the march in Brooklyn and the march
> in South Carolina suggest is that the iconography
> of the current upheaval is beginning to evolve and
> coalesce.
>
> In other words, the BLM Movement in New York and
> South Carolina cared enough to look presentable
> when representing a cause, the clowns at the
> Capitol didn't even think to present themselves
> well. This privileged white class chose to not
> make presentable dress a requirement, or ignored
> its usefulness in getting credibility for their
> message. They dressed like thugs, wearing
> "comfortable clothing," suited not for
> representing a political debate, but more apt for
> a looting TV's during a power black out.
>
> They ultimately acted accordingly.
>
> Their message was dismissed by the American
> people.
>
> My freshman year of university in a dank Scottish
> hills dorm was full of convivial mass drinking at
> night, and awful tidy up the next morning. My
> second year we had a welcome back party to start
> the first trimester. We did something different
> for this soirée and required a dress code to
> attend. Jackets and ties for the lads, and
> dresses for the lasses. We had a great party, and
> in the morning there was very little to do in
> regards to tidying up. People when well dressed
> behave themselves, use the waste baskets, try not
> to spill, have better eating habits, and respect
> those around them who don similar
>
> I cannot give credence to those who stormed the
> Capitol. I cannot juxtapose their motive with
> motivation of the clean shaven with fresh hair
> cuts, turtle neck and grey jacket wearing
> Panther's political message of the 1960's. I can
> only compare them to the slugs who terrorized
> Birmingham streets at night (Who Jeremy Clarkson
> called "hoodies"), just a few summers ago.
>
>
> Dipatched from SoHo, London. It's bedtime chaps.



And your women know how to protest. Looking good here, love!
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