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Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
Date: June 07, 2015 12:36AM

New voltage booster sleeve proven to increase alkaline battery life at 1.5 volts by 800 percent. Eight times the lifespan.

Who needs long lasting Duracell or Energizer when this voltage regulating sleeve can make cheap batteries last forever by utilizing the remaining 80 percent of energy we throw away after the voltage drops.

Your batteries arent dead, in fact you've only used 20 percent of their energy when you throw them away.

I'm very familiar with battery voltage regulation because of vaping. Its ingenious.

One would only assume that devices themselves will soon include voltage regulation as a feature to make your batteries last forever. What I don't understand is why it took so long for it to catch on in the first place.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2928997/batteriser-is-a-250-gadget-that-extends-disposable-battery-life-by-800-percent.html
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batteriser_bt_keyboard-100588209-large.jpg

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
Date: June 07, 2015 12:44AM

Compare that to one of the first voltage regulators in the vaping industry, the kick by evolv. You're dealing with less power designed for smaller batteries with the batteriser so naturally its less expensive and smaller.

The American made and invented kick by evolv was like 45 dollars at first but the chinese knock off ran for like 15 dollars eventually.

The batteriser is for 2.50 a piece.
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kick_01_500.jpg

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: trogdor! ()
Date: June 07, 2015 01:15AM

Sounds a bit like snake oil to me.

Not that I know anything about batteries, but I'm suspicous of products that claim to massively improve any energy device.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/07/2015 01:17AM by trogdor!.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
Date: June 07, 2015 01:22AM

Im been using battery voltage regulators for years now. I assure you its legit.

I think its finally cheap enough to mass produce.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
Date: June 07, 2015 01:34AM

Everything the article talks about including voltage drop I've become an expert in. All the physics are true. I just didnt know that devices rejected alkalines with a voltage drop under 1.5 volts.

I have like 5 voltage regulators. Mine are expensive though and I can get a 3.7 volt battery to 9 volts.

The battery needs to be able to provide the amps with such voltage increase or it can combust but this is only sustaining what voltage an alkaline is supposed to provide out of the box so its very incremental and within the batteries capacity.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Ohm's Law ()
Date: June 07, 2015 11:27AM

8x is probably optimistic but these things are DC-DC converters that draw more current from the battery regardless of the battery's voltage and then deliver the same voltage to the load until the battery actually dies. Still a good idea since they optimize battery life by squeezing the most energy out of them and are reusable.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
Date: June 07, 2015 11:44AM

Do you know if the sleeve is necessary in the circuit?

I know the evolv chip had a negative terminal as well that would contact the side wall of the metal tube that incased the battery and acted as the negative polarity contact for whatever device would be attached.

Seems like integrating voltage regulation as a feature for high end electronics should be a must.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
Date: June 07, 2015 11:51AM

Also one would assume that only clean DC-DC conversion will work in this concept. Pulse width wouldn't I suppose.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: bedfg ()
Date: June 07, 2015 12:13PM

If you're such an "expert" then you should know that there is nothing new about voltage regulation and buck/boost circuits. The only innovative aspect, as the article itself notes, is the packaging in a small sleeve.

There's no magic involved here. No, in practical use it will not increase the life by anywhere near 800% in virtually any device. It might in some circumstances extend the useful life in some particular applications where a device needs to see N volts in order to operate. The math/example that they used to get to that number is idiotic and ignores the fact that many/most devices don't require constant voltage or if they do, then it is at a much lower level. To the extent that level is lower, any benefit will decrease proportionately. It also ignores that time is not constant in the example used. As the circuit must boost voltage from increasingly lower levels, the time over which it can do so will decrease more rapidly so that say boosting from its minimum of 0.6 volts to 1.5 will be very short. It is not increasing the actual energy capacity of the battery. In fact, since the circuit is not perfectly efficient, it actually is somewhat lowering the capacity by consuming some of the energy in order to operate.

I hate to break it to you but the vaping guys just adapted what the high-output flashlight, RC, and other guys have been doing forever with small form factor boost circuits. You could save yourself a lot of time, trouble, and money by picking up cheap, efficient, pre-built driver boards which do exactly the same thing from any number of sources for a few bucks.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
Date: June 07, 2015 01:22PM

I never said I was an expert. That's why I have been asking questions about the topic. You didn't break anything to me quite frankly. And I don't care about the vaping aspect. It's just where I've learned about these circuits.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: yUMbF ()
Date: June 08, 2015 06:39AM

As far as physics, there is only a certain amount of energy present in a battery stored in a chemical form.

Where does the voltage come from? It's the electronegativity of the electrodes. This gives rise to a constant voltage. The voltage drops off as the electrolyte slowly losses ions and the electrodes are plated. Both of these actions increase the internal resistance of the cell and reducing the voltage present. But what it means is that when the voltage starts to drop off you are reaching the point where the battery has little stored potential left.

Can you get 800%? Not likely except for certain low current draw situations which would be atypical and probably poorly designed original circuit in the first place.

As far as high output flashlights, I gather they are doing a buck since the voltage drop across an LED is usually "small", like 2V. But you want the flashlight to run for a while, so use a couple cells to get 6V and smartly buck the high voltage low current to low voltage high current.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: G2 is an Indian cow fucker ()
Date: June 08, 2015 06:51AM

Go vape some bleach and ammonia you stupid piece of shit.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: 4VVEh ()
Date: June 08, 2015 09:19PM

Gerrymanderer2 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> New voltage booster sleeve proven to increase
> alkaline battery life at 1.5 volts by 800 percent.
> Eight times the lifespan.
>
> Who needs long lasting Duracell or Energizer when
> this voltage regulating sleeve can make cheap
> batteries last forever by utilizing the remaining
> 80 percent of energy we throw away after the
> voltage drops.
>
> Your batteries arent dead, in fact you've only
> used 20 percent of their energy when you throw
> them away.
>
> I'm very familiar with battery voltage regulation
> because of vaping. Its ingenious.
>
> One would only assume that devices themselves will
> soon include voltage regulation as a feature to
> make your batteries last forever. What I don't
> understand is why it took so long for it to catch
> on in the first place.
>
> http://www.pcworld.com/article/2928997/batteriser-
> is-a-250-gadget-that-extends-disposable-battery-li
> fe-by-800-percent.html


they know you can't see them face to face

their in another country and used debt to make that lie

unlike you they live in an overcrowed corrupt world far longer - and understand well you'll never see their face to kick their ass


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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
Date: June 08, 2015 11:43PM

yUMbF Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> As far as physics, there is only a certain amount
> of energy present in a battery stored in a
> chemical form.
>
> Where does the voltage come from? It's the
> electronegativity of the electrodes. This gives
> rise to a constant voltage. The voltage drops off
> as the electrolyte slowly losses ions and the
> electrodes are plated. Both of these actions
> increase the internal resistance of the cell and
> reducing the voltage present. But what it means
> is that when the voltage starts to drop off you
> are reaching the point where the battery has
> little stored potential left.
>
> Can you get 800%? Not likely except for certain
> low current draw situations which would be
> atypical and probably poorly designed original
> circuit in the first place.
>
> As far as high output flashlights, I gather they
> are doing a buck since the voltage drop across an
> LED is usually "small", like 2V. But you want the
> flashlight to run for a while, so use a couple
> cells to get 6V and smartly buck the high voltage
> low current to low voltage high current.


So you're saying to suggest that after voltage drop has occurred, saying there is still 80 percent of the batteries energy remaining is innaccurate?

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: 4LNwL ()
Date: June 09, 2015 12:52AM

Gerrymanderer2 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> So you're saying to suggest that after voltage
> drop has occurred, saying there is still 80
> percent of the batteries energy remaining is
> innaccurate?

It's not incorrect strictly speaking but it is misleading. As a simple way of explaining it, think of the energy stored in a battery as constant similar to a glass full of water. At whatever rate something 'drinks' that water, the water/energy will be consumed and withdrawn from the glass/battery.

For something that requires that the rate must be 1.5v to operate, it pumps up the flow to that rate (down to a point that the glass is only about half full where it no longer can). So, basically, it just pumps the water/energy at a faster but constant rate.

That's as opposed to a standard pump/battery which just flows at whatever rate for as long as it can, gradually tapering down as low in the glass as it can go.

For devices that require a high constant voltage, the former will run longer at that higher constant voltage. BUT it will consume the overall water/energy contained in the glass/battery at that higher rate.

For devices that don't care, they'll 'drink' what they can for as long as they can sipping all the way down for longer and lower than the regulated circuit.

So, in one sense for certain applications, it may hold that higher constant voltage for a longer period of time. Whether that works out to be 80% for any given device depends on that that device requires and the circuit. It will not increase the power available in any way. In fact, it will consume the energy faster (and will consume some itself due to the circuit).

As another more practical example, take two LED flashlights, one with a regulated circuit and one not regulated and driving the led directly.

The LED requires some relatively level of constant voltage in order to drive the LED at high power. The driver circuit does that. It maintains the constant voltage for as long as it can so that the light continually pumps out 500 or whatever lumens. At the point that it can't, the light dies. Done. Nothing. Notta. It's done. Say that takes 2 hours at full power.

The same battery in the unregulated light will start out at full power and brightness. It will gradually dim so it won't be at the full brightness for as long as the regulated circuit. But it will (ignoring differences in efficiency of the LEDs, various modes that may be stepped down to, etc.) burn for longer time at any level. 500 lumens may last 20 minutes, 400 for another 45, 300 for another hour, 200 for another 2 hours... and so on.

Also to answer your earlier question re PWM, yes, you can have PWM in such circuits. That's fairly typical.

> >
> > As far as high output flashlights, I gather
> they
> > are doing a buck since the voltage drop across
> an
> > LED is usually "small", like 2V. But you want
> the
> > flashlight to run for a while, so use a couple
> > cells to get 6V and smartly buck the high
> voltage
> > low current to low voltage high current.
>
>

It varies by what it is but generally they use both boost and buck in LED lights. Typically a single or multiple 3.5v lithium batteries will be boosted up to N volts to drive higher power LEDs and get the very high outputs. Buck circuits are used as you describe to run at low power levels forever. Lots of variations depending on what somebody's trying to accomplish. e.g., do you want a flamethrower or a light that runs for weeks or something in between and with multiple modes.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
Date: June 09, 2015 12:57AM

Do they use these drivers in smaller led flashlights to increase voltage and produce higher lumens in a more compact form? For shorter periods of time of course.

Good way to get more light more compact.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: judkE ()
Date: June 09, 2015 02:06AM

Gerrymanderer2 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Do they use these drivers in smaller led
> flashlights to increase voltage and produce higher
> lumens in a more compact form? For shorter periods
> of time of course.
>
> Good way to get more light more compact.


Yes. In most of the better ones with the higher output CREE and similar LEDs anyway. The junky LED lights like those at the Dollar Store are just driving the LEDs direct usually. I have tiny little AAA and AA sized lights that easily put out way more light than the big old 3-cell Maglights. Especially so if they run the 3.5v lithium cells. The driver boards generally are sized to easily fit into whatever battery form is to be used.

e.g.:

1127407-6.jpg

Also, I should have given a better example of where the Batteriser thing is intended to work.

Say you have a remote control or other device which requires between 1.5v and 1.1v to operate (I'm making these numbers up, I have no idea what a remote actually uses). At the point that the battery level can deliver between 1.5v and 1.1v the regulated circuit does little to nothing for you. It's effectively a wash between the regulated and unregulated. The point that it comes into play is when the voltage the battery can deliver drops below 1.1v. Without it, the device would appear to be effectively dead. With it, it will boost whatever power is available up to 1.5v allowing it to continue to work. That continues down to 0.6v.

So it's not really able to deliver a difference of the full "80%" left in the battery Between 1.5v and 1.1v, it's consuming slightly more power due to the circuit (but well designed circuits are fairly efficient so that's fairly negligible). So that's basically a wash between the two. It only works down to 0.6v. The difference would be whatever the time/power/percentage however you want to calculate it between 1.1v and 0.6v. i.e., For that device/example, it's leaving about "50%" that it can't use either below 0.6v and it doesn't really matter from 1.5v - 1.1v, so it's the ~0.5v range of difference or about 30%-ish in terms of the approximately longer time that it would continue to operate. (None of this is technically exactly correct but basically that's the magnitude of the difference.) Then you'd have to calculate the cost for that difference given the cost of batteries vs the device and whatever variance there may be for better or worse in whatever specific device you might use it.

Hopefully that all makes sense.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: dEndP ()
Date: June 09, 2015 07:24AM

>So you're saying to suggest that after voltage drop has occurred, saying there is still 80 percent of the batteries energy remaining is innaccurate?

Voltage drop always occurs but the drop off isn't linear. Since we are probably talking about alkaline battery chemistry, look at these graphs:

http://media.professional.duracell.com/downloads//datasheets/product/Industrial/ID_AA_ID1500.pdf

http://www.mpoweruk.com/performance.htm


By the time you reach 1.1V you have consumed 80% of the battery life. Note that those curves are rapidly falling off as they reach 0.8V. There isn't some magical flat region of the curve below 0.8V that the battery vendors are hiding from you. Once the electrolyte is gone the internal resistance rapidly increases.

I am still confused about why everyone here seems to think high power LED's are high voltage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode

The different voltages are due to the different band gaps in the p-n junctions but none are what I would call high voltage. Yes, there are high power LED's but power != voltage.

Lastly, you always need some sort of regulation with LED's. You can't just stick one in a flashlight. Why not? LED's internal resistance is very low (in its forward operating region). It's practically shorting the batteries to place an LED in series. Obviously the cheapest way to regulate this is a resistor to limit the current draw. Resistors are cheap but very inefficient. Voltage regulators are a better choice.

Yes, if you are driving an LED from a 1.5V cell you need a boost converter. But I really haven't seen too many single cell high power flashlights.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: Caught Again ()
Date: June 09, 2015 10:22AM

>>Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of >>business.
>>Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
>>Date: June 07, 2015 01:34AM
>>
>>Everything the article talks about including voltage drop I've become an >>expert in.

THEN...

>>Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of >>business.
>>Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
>>Date: June 07, 2015 01:22PM
>>
>>I never said I was an expert.


LOLZ, Typical libturd

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: yNXkm ()
Date: June 09, 2015 01:03PM

dEndP Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
>
> ...I am still confused about why everyone here seems
> to think high power LED's are high voltage.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light-emitting_diode
>
> The different voltages are due to the different
> band gaps in the p-n junctions but none are what I
> would call high voltage. Yes, there are high
> power LED's but power != voltage.
> ...
> Yes, if you are driving an LED from a 1.5V cell you
> need a boost converter. But I really haven't seen
> too many single cell high power flashlights.


They're not and as you say you don't really need "high" voltage. What you want to drive the higher-output LEDs is current and the relative increase in high(ER) input voltage gives you the ability to get the ^ increase in current (up to the limit of the LED obviously).

e.g., as a typical example of a modern LED light, something like the JetBeam PA10. Using a standard alkaline or NiMH at ~1.5v or ~1.2v drives a max output of ~140 lumens. Using a 14500 3.6v lithium rechargeable gets you to ~650 lumens from the same LED/driver.

I've not looked lately to see what the latest and greatest is as far as LED lights but things scale up rapidly from there to those with multiple Cree XM-L LEDs using multiple lithium cells like the Nitecore TM26 "Tiny Monster" which puts out ~3,500 lumens using 4 XML emitters and 4 18650 or 8 CR123 rechargeables:

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?356042-NITECORE-TM26-QUADRAY-%284-x-XM-L-U2-1-4x18650-2-8xR-CR123%29-Review

And it goes way beyond that.

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: j7Cew ()
Date: June 10, 2015 06:20AM

Caught Again Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> >>Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put
> big battery companies out of >>business.
> >>Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
> >>Date: June 07, 2015 01:34AM
> >>
> >>Everything the article talks about including
> voltage drop I've become an >>expert in.
>
> THEN...
>
> >>Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put
> big battery companies out of >>business.
> >>Posted by: Gerrymanderer2 ()
> >>Date: June 07, 2015 01:22PM
> >>
> >>I never said I was an expert.
>
>
> LOLZ, Typical libturd

In the words of my favorite liberal, "What does it matter?" "It's in the past."

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: bJ44C ()
Date: June 10, 2015 04:34PM

got me one of these for $1

has worked many years though it's used a few times a year at most
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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: 7cdGF ()
Date: June 10, 2015 04:36PM

.
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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: db3VM ()
Date: June 10, 2015 04:39PM


have you ever hand cranked a rotor to see how much energy it takes to keep a 60 watt bulb lit? you'd loose your arm in less than an hour doing it.

if you had maybe you'd appreciate what a shameful waste of effort/energy leaving the lights on is



or say a city full of people who never turn off lights and demand to wear shorts in the winter and sweats in the summer

^^ the invention above (as a learning tool for teaching conservation) started in up-state new york, in areas where they were avoiding the cost of upgrading power plants

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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: 7eFEk ()
Date: June 10, 2015 04:42PM

.
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Re: Batteriser voltage boosting sleeve will put big battery companies out of business.
Posted by: wPYuj ()
Date: June 10, 2015 04:45PM

what's wrong with a plastic flashlight with handle?

chinese crap breaks easy. before the time you'd normally replace a large battery - the f'ing crank will break.

most plastic things from china are designed to fail - have non-replaceable critical parts that are far under specified and impossible shaped (impossible substitute). designed to fail. AND THEY DO SO in products that "look beefy" and cost more than other chinese crap.

i'd love to find out what devils have been plauging the USA with landfill crap designed to fail

it's f'ing chinese water torture is what's wrong

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