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Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Raven23 ()
Date: January 25, 2017 11:38PM

Anyone know how safe the water for drinking from the tap? In VA, northern VA?

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Raven23 ()
Date: January 25, 2017 11:40PM

Correction- how safe is the drinking water (from the tap) in northern va?

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Nova ph ()
Date: January 25, 2017 11:44PM

It pretty good, considering where it comes from. The reports are here:

https://www.fcwa.org/water/water.htm


Remember that not all Fairfax water is treated at the same plant, to wit:

"Fairfax Water draws raw water from two primary sources: the Potomac
River and the Occoquan Reservoir, which is fed by the Occoquan
River. The four facilities that treat your water feed an interconnected
distribution system. The Corbalis Treatment Plant and the Dalecarlia
and McMillan Treatment Plants treat water from the Potomac River. The
Frederick P. Griffith Jr. Treatment Plant treats water from the Occoquan
Reservoir"

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: word ()
Date: January 26, 2017 12:00AM

i was told to get a filter. the water you crap/piss in goes into the river and is processed with chemicals and then you drink it. repeat.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Raven23 ()
Date: January 26, 2017 12:51AM

Nova ph Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> It pretty good, considering where it comes from.
> The reports are here:
>
> https://www.fcwa.org/water/water.htm
>
>
> Remember that not all Fairfax water is treated at
> the same plant, to wit:
>
> "Fairfax Water draws raw water from two primary
> sources: the Potomac
> River and the Occoquan Reservoir, which is
> fed by the Occoquan

Yes but how is it treated? Is it treated like a filter pitcher? What is the process that makes it drinkable?
> River. The four facilities that treat your
> water feed an interconnected
> distribution system. The Corbalis Treatment
> Plant and the Dalecarlia
> and McMillan Treatment Plants treat water from the
> Potomac River. The
> Frederick P. Griffith Jr. Treatment Plant treats
> water from the Occoquan
> Reservoir"

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Raven23 ()
Date: January 26, 2017 12:54AM

So this why so many people get sick? Cancer? What about the wildlife? Seems that everything is poisoned...

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: undrinkable stew of toxic waste ()
Date: January 26, 2017 07:47AM

word Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> i was told to get a filter. the water you
> crap/piss in goes into the river and is processed
> with chemicals and then you drink it. repeat.

Stuff like Brita filters are really only good for removing slight odors from chlorine chemicals etc if you have that. They'll make the water taste better but they won't purify water. And if you don't clean your pitcher regularly and change the filters, you're likely adding bacteria into your water every time you fill the the thing.

And yeah, our water comes from the rivers, so it's full of everything that gets washed into the river upstream. Animal pee, bird poop, oil & gas from cars, anything that washes into the storm drains, dead decaying animals, molecular plastics, industrial chemicals, etc. I'd be less worried about natural stuff like pee and poop than i would about the chemicals that get washed into it.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: It depends ()
Date: January 26, 2017 08:06AM

Remember that if you don't drink tap water, you should be taking fluoride supplements.

My mom drank the local water and lived to a ripe old age, but my dad drank it as a kid and died young so you never can tell. It was a bus accident, if you were wondering.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: county sewage ()
Date: January 26, 2017 10:02AM

word Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> i was told to get a filter. the water you
> crap/piss in goes into the river

if your starting to get piss and shit smells coming from your water you should call the county. it could mean your water has started to become contaminated and could be hazardous. it's definitely not normal.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Raven23 ()
Date: January 26, 2017 10:15AM

What I'm thinking is what if someone comes up with cancer 15 yrs from now? The water had pesticide residue?
Bottled water is the only safe way?

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Water is Life ()
Date: January 26, 2017 10:46AM

Raven23 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> What I'm thinking is what if someone comes up with
> cancer 15 yrs from now? The water had pesticide
> residue?
> Bottled water is the only safe way?

I'm saying this without any bullshit and using facts.

My agenda: Everyone should have access to safe drinking water and know what they are drinking.

55% of bottled water is from groundwater (Arrowhead, Crystal Geyser) mostly in drought-ridden areas.

45% of bottled water (Dasani, Aquafina) is from municipal tap water just like out of your faucet.

Companies aren't required to publicly disclose exactly where their sources are or how much water each facility bottles. And there has been E.coli (among other problems) found in bottle water.

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/aquafina-source-tap-water/story?id=3428260
http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2014/08/bottled-water-california-drought
http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-bottled-water-health-0127-20160127-story.html

Bottled water isn't the way. It's costly and exacerbating the problem of safe water by increasing pollution.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: YHkeU ()
Date: January 26, 2017 01:56PM

Consumer Reports Highly rated for removing lead

Carafe

Clear2OCWS100

Faucet-mounted water filters

CulliganFM-15A

counter Top Filters

ShakleeBestWater MTS2000 #82300

undersink

MultipureMP750SB

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: PLUmber ()
Date: January 26, 2017 02:09PM

Standards for Filters

Residential drinking water filters are covered by two industry standards: NSF/ANSI Standard 42 and NSF/ANSI Standard 53. The standards are identical when it comes to evaluating the materials safety and structural integrity of a filtration system (if connected to a pressurized supply), but each standard covers a different type of chemical reduction performance testing. Standard 42 covers aesthetic (taste and odor) claims, while Standard 53 addresses health-related claims. Although both standards cover drinking water filters, the methods of performance testing found in the standards vary.


NSF/ANSI Standard 42

The commonly tested chemical reduction claims for products seeking certification to NSF/ANSI Standard 42 are: chlorine (taste and odor), chloramines, iron, manganese, hydrogen sulfide, pH neutralization and zinc reduction.

Filters subject to line pressure in the field that are tested for one of these non-health claims are installed and operated at a 60 psi dynamic (flowing) inlet pressure and run at the manufacturer’s desired rated service flow rate until the filter’s reduction capacity is achieved.

All chemical reduction tests are ran using a 16-hour test period with an eight-hour rest period, unless the rated capacity of a filter is achieved prior to the completion of the 16 hours of testing.

Testing for point-of-use (POU) chemical reduction claims is conducted in duplicate, but iron, manganese and all POE chemical reduction testing only requires one system to be tested. The type of system and anticipated pattern use allows the manufacturer the option of choosing the operating cycle of the chemical reduction test.

Batch water treatment systems (pour-through pitcher and other gravity systems) are tested based on the manufacturer’s recommended pattern use, typically two to six gallons per day.

Depending on the intended frequency of use, plumbed-in POU systems can be tested using either a 50%-on/50%-off cycle or a 10%-on/90%-off cycle.

For whole house POE systems, one system is tested continuously for 16 hours followed by an eight-hour rest period each day until the rated capacity is reached.

All chemical reduction testing found in NSF/ANSI Standard 42 is conducted to 100% of the manufacturer’s anticipated reduction capacity for the drinking water filtration system with the exception of iron and manganese, which are conducted to 120% of the system’s reduction capacity.


NSF/ANSI Standard 53 YOU WANT THIS

The commonly tested chemical reduction claims for products seeking certification to NSF/ANSI Standard 53 are: heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury and selenium), inorganics (fluoride and nitrate plus nitrite) and volatile organic chemicals (chloroform surrogate as well as individual organic chemicals).

Standard 53 testing differs from Standard 42 testing in the fact that testing is conducted at the maximum flow rate that results from a 60-psi dynamic (flowing) inlet pressure and is run to either 120% or 200% of the manufacturer’s anticipated reduction capacity.

Testing for health contaminants requires added safety, so NSF/ANSI Standard 53 allows the use of performance indication devices (PIDs). PIDs inform the end user when the product has reached its rated capacity by a flashing light, audible alarm or by reducing or stopping the flow of water through the system.

Chemical reduction testing conducted on a system that has a PID is required to run for 120% of the system’s rated capacity. Systems can also be tested without PIDs, but Standard 53 requires that these products be tested to 200% of the system’s rated capacity. Testing cycle options are the same as Standard 42, which are 50%-on/50%-off or 10%-on/90%-off for 16 hours with an eight-hour rest period. All chemical reduction testing conducted according to Standard 53 is conducted in duplicate, including POE testing.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Goose Poop ()
Date: January 26, 2017 02:12PM

You ever see how many geese poop in the Occoquan Reservoir?

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Leadman ()
Date: January 26, 2017 02:15PM

Fairfax Water meets the minimum government standards at the pumping station, just like in Flint, Michigan.

It's the old pipes between there and your tap where the lead and other contaminants leech in.

Test your water annually. It's the only way you will know if there is a problem with it.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: High Quality H2O ()
Date: January 26, 2017 02:22PM

The tap water has less bacteria than any bottled water. Not sure about the lead comment either. I do not suspect lead is an issue with tap water in Northern VA.

Leadman your flint MI comment is way off by the way as it suggests our water has the same issues -- get real.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: FairfaxWater on Lead ()
Date: January 26, 2017 02:25PM


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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Leadman ()
Date: January 26, 2017 04:26PM

High Quality H2O Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The tap water has less bacteria than any bottled
> water. Not sure about the lead comment either. I
> do not suspect lead is an issue with tap water in
> Northern VA.
>
> Leadman your flint MI comment is way off by the
> way as it suggests our water has the same issues
> -- get real.


Just pointing out that the Federal minimum standards at the pump are not a sufficient measure of water quality at the tap.

To assert that tap water has less bacteria than "any" bottled water is foolish.

You must test yourself to be sure. Especially if your home was built prior to the late 1970s when leaded components were finally sold out of the supply system.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: ydTT9 ()
Date: January 26, 2017 04:31PM

Fairfax puts phosphates in your water to try to reduce the lead content. Choose your poison.

It's 1986 that lead pipes were outlawed, not the late 1970s.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: pFVtC ()
Date: January 26, 2017 04:31PM

Tap water has 1 component which literally kills nearly all bacteria -- Chlorine ... bottled water is known to have more than piped tap .. it's quite simple.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: LX6Kn ()
Date: January 26, 2017 07:17PM

There's a lot of other stuff that's more likely going to hurt or kill you than tap water. People smoke, eat crap food, sit on their asses, and worry about their tap water.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Leadman ()
Date: January 26, 2017 08:40PM

pFVtC Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Tap water has 1 component which literally kills
> nearly all bacteria -- Chlorine ... bottled water
> is known to have more than piped tap .. it's quite
> simple.


Again, your mileage may vary.

Chlorine dissipates quickly, especially when in contact with contaminants. Go to any community pool and see how much chlorine (bleach) they have to pump into the water every day, event when no one is using it.

Depending on where you live, you might have enough chlorine in your tap water that you can smell/taste it. Or your water may sit in pipes for weeks and have no residual chlorine to disinfect it.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Science, bitches ()
Date: January 26, 2017 10:36PM

Leadman Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> pFVtC Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Tap water has 1 component which literally kills
> > nearly all bacteria -- Chlorine ... bottled
> water
> > is known to have more than piped tap .. it's
> quite
> > simple.
>
>
> Again, your mileage may vary.
>
> Chlorine dissipates quickly, especially when in
> contact with contaminants. Go to any community
> pool and see how much chlorine (bleach) they have
> to pump into the water every day, event when no
> one is using it.
>
> Depending on where you live, you might have enough
> chlorine in your tap water that you can
> smell/taste it. Or your water may sit in pipes
> for weeks and have no residual chlorine to
> disinfect it.

Chlorine doesn't smell. It's chloramines that smell.
When chlorine mixes with piss, sweat, oily hair and skin it makes chloramines.
https://chlorine.americanchemistry.com/Science-Center/Chlorine-Compound-of-the-Month-Library/Chloramines-Understanding-Pool-Smell/

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Davester ()
Date: March 23, 2018 09:59PM

Read Game wardens fish eating advisory. Mercury leaked out of a plant in Luray contaiminating the south fork Shenandoah. PCB advisory’s from power transformers. And if you don’t get the call when the county cleans the pipes out you shouldn’t drink it.
Bottled for me:)

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: super redundant ()
Date: March 23, 2018 10:36PM

I buy bottled water and put it through a reverse osmosis system. Then I put that through a Brita filter. Then I boil the water. I think I am good to go. It takes four hours to take a shower but at least I am safe.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Henry Mozes ()
Date: October 09, 2020 12:49PM

I think it will be good to buy water cooler and order clean water!

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Mark Shens ()
Date: October 10, 2020 10:09AM

Good day. I don't think that it is good idea to drink water from tap and it doesn't matter where do you live. Some people use filters, some people buy bottled water. Personally I have water cooler at home, very cool decision. You can check such devices in this blog https://devices4home.com/best-water-coolers/

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Big Al ()
Date: October 10, 2020 12:31PM

I don't trust water... I mean... you heard what it did to the Titanic...

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: mspa34 ()
Date: November 25, 2021 02:05PM

I don't trust water from the tap)

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Date: November 25, 2021 02:15PM

"I buy bottled water and put it through a reverse osmosis system. Then I put that through a Brita filter. Then I boil the water. I think I am good to go. It takes four hours to take a shower but at least I am safe."

lol

"I don't trust water from the tap)"

its very very rare that eye drink tap water....but honestly, water in plastic bottles is pretty gay too

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Date: November 28, 2021 04:44PM

What I enjoy drinking most is my own diarrhea. It's delicious.

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Re: Drinking water-how safe?
Posted by: Poop Drinker ()
Date: November 28, 2021 04:52PM

the real GeneraI Mahdi Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> What I enjoy drinking most is my own diarrhea.
> It's delicious.


Please drink my diarrhea. It’s got a nice aroma because I eat every day at Tippys Taco.

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