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Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: star gazer ()
Date: January 21, 2013 08:52PM

that bright light right next to the moon is Jupiter. Cool, huh?

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: peerer ()
Date: January 21, 2013 08:59PM

cool.

thank you.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: nature boy ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:00PM

Thanx man that is awesome!

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: nature boy ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:14PM

Jupiter looks small but is actually 20 times larger than the moon. It is thousands of miles past the moon that is why it looks small.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Priapus ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:15PM

Does this mean Uncle Martin can get home?

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: praise him ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:17PM

obama made it happen, one of his many gifts

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: 404ed ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:21PM

nature boy Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Jupiter looks small but is actually 20 times
> larger than the moon. It is thousands of miles
> past the moon that is why it looks small.


Oh I think its more than 20 times.....


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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Moon ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:24PM

Yeah. Thanks

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Andrew Ryan ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:41PM

Sweet! That was awesome, thanks a lot!

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Frank ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:42PM

Cool! thanks.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Billy Davis Jr. ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:44PM

This is the dawning of the Age of Aquarius, the Age of Aquarius, Aquarius, Aquarius!

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: eesh ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:45PM

It's beautiful. Can anyone see Jupiter's red spot?

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: obamaisthebest ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:48PM

Thanks for posting, OP!

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: nature boy ()
Date: January 21, 2013 09:51PM

We wont be able to this again until 2026 so call all your friends and family and tell them to go out and have a look.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: joanne mccune ()
Date: January 21, 2013 11:29PM

thank you,noticed it tonite right away and wondered what the hell.very cool

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Very Nice ()
Date: January 22, 2013 01:09AM

Wow, that was cool. Thanks for letting us know.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: FUNdamental ()
Date: January 22, 2013 09:04AM

eesh Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> It's beautiful. Can anyone see Jupiter's red spot?

I took my kids out last night with a Meade telescope around 7:00 PM. The moon was practically a strait shot directly above my house, so the telescope was at a obnoxious almost 90 degree angle. We were able to locate Jupiter pretty easily, and it was smaller than a dime in my view finder.

We were able to see the outline of "the red spot," though not in color-white and shades of gray. Also, because of the small size of Jupiter in my view screen we were able to see the planet's moving storms which appeared to going quickly from one side of the planet to the other.

It was very cool.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: MrMephisto ()
Date: January 22, 2013 09:22AM

nature boy Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Jupiter looks small but is actually 20 times
> larger than the moon. It is thousands of miles
> past the moon that is why it looks small.

Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. Hold up a second.

So things just LOOK small when they're further away? Here, I thought I was living in some sort of weird Alice in Wonderland dimension where things just kept getting bigger or smaller.

My gods, man. This explains everything. No wonder people were giving me funny looks when I kept trying to squish their heads between my fingers like a grape. I thought I just had terrible aim.

--------------------------------------------------------------
13 4826 0948 82695 25847. Yes.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: FUNdamental ()
Date: January 22, 2013 09:41AM

nature boy Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Jupiter looks small but is actually 20 times
> larger than the moon. It is thousands of miles
> past the moon that is why it looks small.


For the official FXU record, Jupiter's surface area is 122 times the Earth's surface area. Given that fact, I would think Jupiter is more than 20 times the moon's size.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: WhereIsMyGuy ()
Date: January 22, 2013 08:25PM

A local contractor has been hiring illegals and murdering them at the end of the job to avoid paying them. FCPD received a tip that the the bodies were being hidden on the moon. The light you see is not Jupiter, it is in fact a FCPD helicopter searching the surface of the moon.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: The Stand ()
Date: January 22, 2013 08:30PM

M.O.O.N.....That spells Tom Cullen!!

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: bright star ()
Date: January 22, 2013 08:31PM

it has something to do with uranus

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­
Posted by: chuckhoffmann ()
Date: January 22, 2013 09:06PM

­



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/17/2013 01:35AM by chuckhoffmann.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Mom l ()
Date: February 20, 2013 09:54PM

You have children? I'm really surprised!! I guess they are still young and not out there drinking and driving and running over poor defenseless dogs!! That explains your reponse to my comment!!! When your kids are doing that crap then e'll see ow you feel until then shut your ignorant mouth :)

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: tellitlikeitis ()
Date: February 20, 2013 11:17PM

Mom l Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> You have children? I'm really surprised!! I guess
> they are still young and not out there drinking
> and driving and running over poor defenseless
> dogs!! That explains your reponse to my comment!!!
> When your kids are doing that crap then e'll see
> ow you feel until then shut your ignorant mouth :)
Attachments:
opKDy.gif

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Berdhuis ()
Date: February 20, 2013 11:38PM

FUNdamental Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> eesh Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > It's beautiful. Can anyone see Jupiter's red
> spot?
>
> I took my kids out last night with a Meade
> telescope around 7:00 PM. The moon was
> practically a strait shot directly above my house,
> so the telescope was at a obnoxious almost 90
> degree angle. We were able to locate Jupiter
> pretty easily, and it was smaller than a dime in
> my view finder.
>
> We were able to see the outline of "the red spot,"
> though not in color-white and shades of gray.
> Also, because of the small size of Jupiter in my
> view screen we were able to see the planet's
> moving storms which appeared to going quickly from
> one side of the planet to the other.
>
> It was very cool.

Same here, last night not much wind. Good for you! What kind of scope do you have? I cannot resolve to the magnitude that you can.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Berdhuis ()
Date: February 20, 2013 11:40PM

chuckhoffmann Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> bright star Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > it has something to do with uranus
>
> I can see Uranus from my house, but it's really
> faint and dim.

Chuck, is that Stellarium you're using?

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­
Posted by: chuckhoffmann ()
Date: February 20, 2013 11:49PM

­



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 04/17/2013 12:47AM by chuckhoffmann.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: FUNdamental ()
Date: February 22, 2013 12:32PM

Berdhuis Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> FUNdamental Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > eesh Wrote:
> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> > -----
> > > It's beautiful. Can anyone see Jupiter's red
> > spot?
> >
> > I took my kids out last night with a Meade
> > telescope around 7:00 PM. The moon was
> > practically a strait shot directly above my
> house,
> > so the telescope was at a obnoxious almost 90
> > degree angle. We were able to locate Jupiter
> > pretty easily, and it was smaller than a dime
> in
> > my view finder.
> >
> > We were able to see the outline of "the red
> spot,"
> > though not in color-white and shades of gray.
> > Also, because of the small size of Jupiter in
> my
> > view screen we were able to see the planet's
> > moving storms which appeared to going quickly
> from
> > one side of the planet to the other.
> >
> > It was very cool.
>
> Same here, last night not much wind. Good for you!
> What kind of scope do you have? I cannot resolve
> to the magnitude that you can.


I have a Meade EXT 125 with AutoStar. I also use a 40mmm eye piece. I have never really used the Autostar.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Berdhuis ()
Date: February 22, 2013 05:08PM

FUNdamental Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Berdhuis Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > FUNdamental Wrote:
> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> > -----
> > > eesh Wrote:
> > >
> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> >
> > > -----
> > > > It's beautiful. Can anyone see Jupiter's
> red
> > > spot?
> > >
> > > I took my kids out last night with a Meade
> > > telescope around 7:00 PM. The moon was
> > > practically a strait shot directly above my
> > house,
> > > so the telescope was at a obnoxious almost 90
> > > degree angle. We were able to locate Jupiter
> > > pretty easily, and it was smaller than a dime
> > in
> > > my view finder.
> > >
> > > We were able to see the outline of "the red
> > spot,"
> > > though not in color-white and shades of gray.
>
> > > Also, because of the small size of Jupiter in
> > my
> > > view screen we were able to see the planet's
> > > moving storms which appeared to going quickly
> > from
> > > one side of the planet to the other.
> > >
> > > It was very cool.
> >
> > Same here, last night not much wind. Good for
> you!
> > What kind of scope do you have? I cannot
> resolve
> > to the magnitude that you can.
>
>
> I have a Meade EXT 125 with AutoStar. I also use
> a 40mmm eye piece. I have never really used the
> Autostar.


Impressive, with a 127mm Maksutov you were able to resolve the moving storm bands on Jupiter, wow. Were you using the 40mm eyepiece then, or something around a 5mm-10mm eyepiece for that detail?

I'm using a 4" achromatic refractor and cannot tell that the storm bands are actually moving or swirling.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: TheMeeper ()
Date: February 22, 2013 07:19PM

FUNdamental Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> we were able to see the planet's
> moving storms which appeared to going quickly from
> one side of the planet to the other.
>
> It was very cool.

There must have been some kind of distortion in your field of view, because there's no way you could see the motion of the storms on Jupiter. Jupiter's diameter is about 90,000 miles. If you were seeing the storms moving quickly from one side to the other, they would have to be moving at an enormous rate of speed, a whole lot faster than the rotation of the planet. For perspective, the moons encircling Jupiter are moving much much faster than any storm, and you cannot see those moons move (unless you're looking for days at a time and plotting their positions).

Still pretty cool though. Telescopes are awesome.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Berdhuis ()
Date: February 25, 2013 07:50PM

Incredible moonrise this evening - as orange as you can get, nearly full, was able to zoom at 160x for nice details of ridges and craters on the edge. Also fun when a goose traversed the field of view in front of the moon - cool silhouette.

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i'm such a child.............
Posted by: Gordon Blvd ()
Date: February 25, 2013 07:55PM

.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/25/2013 07:57PM by Gordon Blvd.
Attachments:
-4430-6379.jpg

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: stui ()
Date: February 25, 2013 08:02PM

Berdhuis Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Incredible moonrise this evening - as orange as
> you can get, nearly full, was able to zoom at 160x
> for nice details of ridges and craters on the
> edge. Also fun when a goose traversed the field of
> view in front of the moon - cool silhouette.


Awesome full moon, thanx man.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Berdhuis ()
Date: February 25, 2013 08:04PM

^^^ What, does your butt hurt? You mad that you don't have a telescope? Take it somewhere else, please.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 02/25/2013 08:06PM by Berdhuis.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: FUNdamental ()
Date: February 25, 2013 08:04PM

Berdhuis Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> FUNdamental Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Berdhuis Wrote:
> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> > -----
> > > FUNdamental Wrote:
> > >
> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> >
> > > -----
> > > > eesh Wrote:
> > > >
> > >
> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> >
> > >
> > > > -----
> > > > > It's beautiful. Can anyone see Jupiter's
> > red
> > > > spot?
> > > >
> > > > I took my kids out last night with a Meade
> > > > telescope around 7:00 PM. The moon was
> > > > practically a strait shot directly above my
> > > house,
> > > > so the telescope was at a obnoxious almost
> 90
> > > > degree angle. We were able to locate
> Jupiter
> > > > pretty easily, and it was smaller than a
> dime
> > > in
> > > > my view finder.
> > > >
> > > > We were able to see the outline of "the red
> > > spot,"
> > > > though not in color-white and shades of
> gray.
> >
> > > > Also, because of the small size of Jupiter
> in
> > > my
> > > > view screen we were able to see the
> planet's
> > > > moving storms which appeared to going
> quickly
> > > from
> > > > one side of the planet to the other.
> > > >
> > > > It was very cool.
> > >
> > > Same here, last night not much wind. Good for
> > you!
> > > What kind of scope do you have? I cannot
> > resolve
> > > to the magnitude that you can.
> >
> >
> > I have a Meade EXT 125 with AutoStar. I also
> use
> > a 40mmm eye piece. I have never really used
> the
> > Autostar.
>
>
> Impressive, with a 127mm Maksutov you were able to
> resolve the moving storm bands on Jupiter, wow.
> Were you using the 40mm eyepiece then, or
> something around a 5mm-10mm eyepiece for that
> detail?
>
> I'm using a 4" achromatic refractor and cannot
> tell that the storm bands are actually moving or
> swirling.

I couldn't see the bands. I could see the outline of the red spot, and the storms appeard to be darting in a chaotic way back and fourth, so I could have used the word "swirling" to describe what I saw.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Berdhuis ()
Date: February 25, 2013 09:24PM

FUNdamental Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

>
> I couldn't see the bands. I could see the outline
> of the red spot, and the storms appeard to be
> darting in a chaotic way back and fourth, so I
> could have used the word "swirling" to describe
> what I saw.

You would be able to see the storm bands sooner than the red spot. There are two, wide ones on the equator (equatorial bands) that are typically seen first and can have a brown-gray color to them. Then you'd be able to see the thinner ones to the north and south, the red spot would be noticeable then. Could have been atmospheric effects that were causing the dynamic view.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: stui ()
Date: February 27, 2013 10:00PM

Go out and look at the huge full moon now. It is surrounded by clouds and looks awesomw.

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Berdhuis ()
Date: February 27, 2013 10:18PM

stui Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Go out and look at the huge full moon now. It is
> surrounded by clouds and looks awesomw.


Way cool, thanks, man!

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Re: Go out and look at the moon, NOW!
Posted by: Berdhuis ()
Date: March 04, 2013 07:33PM

Go out and catch Sirius at SSE, all of you telescope wielders. And Saturn is up at ESE at 2330 - should be a good show.

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